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Ginny Weds Sunny review

By SUKANYA VERMA
October 09, 2020 16:02 IST
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If the ravishing Yami Gautam injects vivacity and vulnerability in her dilly-dallying Ginny, Vikrant Massey is absolutely smashing as the sweet-natured dunce who endears himself to her, cheers Sukanya Verma.

Never underestimate the cunning of the cloying Punju parent or their offspring to see through their bluff.

In Ginny Weds Sunny, whose title leaves little scope for spoilers or surprise, the business of matchmaking is once again at forefront driving a made-for-each-other couple's meet cute, misunderstandings and marriage.

Despite the plainness of this premise, Puneet Khanna' easy, breezy, low-calorie confection, penned by Navjot Gulati and Sumit Arora, is easy on the eyes and mind. Part of its agreeability stems from a bunch of actors who exude an effortless likeability and the other from the maker's distaste for dragging conflict.

As is the case of all Delhi-based rom-coms, its sprawling neighbourhoods and predominantly Punjabi flavours colour the proceedings for a dash of quirk but never fully draw on its setting.

Ginny Weds Sunny, named so in the tradition of Bunty, Baby, Sonu, Titu, Sweety, because 'Punjabiyon mein papa logic se nahi pyaar se naam rakhte hai' starts out a tad chunkily.

In its eagerness to oversell itself as a comedy, the humour fizzles out.

It's only when director Khanna stops treating anything amusing as some sort of a gag and goes easy on the laughter cues, the levity takes effect.

 

Cooking expert Sunny (Vikrant Massey) wants to set up a tandoor restaurant in West Delhi, but his father (quietly effective Rajeev Gupta) demands he must settle down first with a Gill or Gulati-next-door.

Enter school-time crush Ginny (Yami Gautam) whom he engages in a lively dance-off at a wedding celebration, which is convenient considering her mum's (fabulous as ever Ayesha Raza Mishra) a professional matchmaker.

The mother, almost Austenian in her enthusiasm to see Ginny married, concocts a plan for Sunny to win her heart.

Over a course of designed happenstances and charming remixes, Sunny's silly smitten kitten evolves into a sympathetic sounding board, but Ginny isn't sure about throwing the not-quite-ex Jat boyfriend (Suhail Nayyar) under the bus.

Ginny's romantic affiliations are a recurring bone of contention and could do with a little more spunk.

One never gets any sense of her compulsions or her mum's hollow definition of romance -- love is a habit, you get used to her, she gets used to you.

For all her independent, livewire, environmentalist, weed-puffing (funny to see how something so casually treated became a matter of national hue-and-cry) persona, she's just another soppy embodiment of the Electra complex.

When Sunny turns brusque as does his competitor over her hand, Ginny Weds Sunny doesn't hold back in concealing one's sexism and another's politics.

But instead of making them look dreadful or dramatic, it gives them the benefit of doubt.

When angry, they're not always likeable and turn victims to presumption giving in to their rash impulses.

Still, essentially, they're decent people. There is honesty in this approach. Somewhere this genuineness helps it overcome a proverbial muddle-in-the-mandap climax.     

Ginny Weds Sunny's star attraction are its titular stars.

If the ravishing Yami Gautam injects vivacity and vulnerability in her dilly-dallying Ginny, Vikrant Massey is absolutely smashing as the sweet-natured dunce who endears himself to her.

Their chemistry exudes a warm fuzzy vibe.

The kind that makes people say, God bless this jodi.

Rediff Rating:

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SUKANYA VERMA / Rediff.com
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