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Type 1 Diabetes On Rise In India

By Anoushka Sawhney
October 03, 2022 10:38 IST
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India on average lost 44.85 years of a lifetime due to Type 1 diabetes in 2021.

*IMAGE: In India, 818,620 people were living with Type 1 diabetes -- an increase of 5.1 per cent from 2020. Photograph: Kind courtesy PhotoMIX Company/Pexels.com
 

India will record an increase of 116 per cent in Type 1 diabetes cases by 2040, up from 2021.

Globally, the number of cases will increase by 106.9 per cent, according to a study published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal.

In 2021, an estimated 8,423,530 people in the world were living with Type 1 diabetes, with 64 per cent of them in the 20-59 age bracket.

In India, 818,620 people were living with Type 1 diabetes -- an increase of 5.1 per cent from 2020.

According to the Lancet study, India is among the top 10 countries that accounted for 60 per cent of the global Type 1 diabetes cases in 2021.

The United States had the highest number of cases (1,414,441), followed by India (818,620), Brazil (564,249), China (430,647) and Germany (422,087).

The country on average lost 44.85 years of a lifetime due to Type 1 diabetes in 2021. Globally, 32.1 years were lost.

Other non-communicable diseases

While the number of Type 1 diabetes cases has been increasing, diabetes does not make for the highest share in non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in India.

In 2019, NCDs accounted for 66 per cent of total deaths in India, with cardiovascular diseases accounting for the highest number of deaths at 2,566,492.

Chronic respiratory diseases caused 1,146,000 deaths, while cancer led to 920,000 deaths.

However, deaths due to diabetes continue to rise. The number increased from 246,617 in 2010 to 349,515.8 in 2019, according to the World Health Organisation.

According to a report by the World Economic Forum and the Harvard School of Public Health, India would lose $3.55 trillion due to NCDs by 2030, with $0.15 trillion being lost due to diabetes.

Cardiovascular diseases account for the highest share in lost economic output at $2.17 trillion, followed by respiratory diseases ($0.98 trillion) and cancer ($0.25 trillion).

*Kindly note the image has been posted only for representational purposes.

Feature Presentation: Ashish Narsale/Rediff.com

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Anoushka Sawhney
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