rediff.com

NewsApp (Free)

Read news as it happens
Download NewsApp

Available on  

Rediff News  All News 
Rediff.com  » Movies » Aamir Khan's 25 Finest Movie Moments

Aamir Khan's 25 Finest Movie Moments

Last updated on: November 28, 2012 17:21 IST

Aamir Khan's 25 Finest Movie Moments

     Next

Next
Sukanya Verma in Mumbai
Appreciation has many forms. There are actors you love, actors you respect and actors you can trust. 

Over a career spanning more than four decades and only forty films -- some plain dreadful while others so good, they're still clinging with joy into the corners of our memory, the actor quite early (after a series of misfires cashing on his chocolate boy appeal post-Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak) realised the importance of playing it different.

And so while his contemporaries stuck to formulas and safe bets, he experimented with his art, challenged his fate and surprised the audience with something new each and every time thus developing this rare faith in his followers and (even detractors) to feel this incredible curiosity for all his projects -- offbeat or outright commercial.

He's not as much a perfectionist as he's a risk taker, a master strategist who is keen enough to plan and promote a release in a unique fashion. At 47, he's a Padma Bhushan, Time's cover boy, one of India's leading actor-filmmaker and the host of this year's most talked-about social chat show – Satyamev Jayate.

No wonder everyone is eager to see what his upcoming and deliberately delayed Talaash, directed by Reema Kagti and co-produced by him and Farhan Akhtar/Ritesh Sidhwani unfolds this Friday. But before that here's a look at 25 of his most memorable moments on the silver screen.

Yaadon Ki Baarat

Even as a 7-year-old, Aamir Khan struck box office gold as Master Ratan, a younger version of his cousin Tariq, in uncle Nasir Hussain's timeless musical Yaadon Ki Baarat. 

A far cry from his method acting days, all he had to do is flash his famous smile and look generally adorable. 

Image: A scene from Yaadon Ki Baraat


     Next

Holi

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
This Khan has literally grown up in front of the screen.

That walk in pair of teensie shorts, ladies and gentleman, while finishing his morning chores, is quite literally his first ever scene as a grown up even if only for a low-budget student film by Ketan Mehta.

It's also his first-ever sporting a moustache, a ploy that was almost reduced to a gimmick in the same filmmaker's lavishly scaled, Mangal Pandey: The Rising.

Image: A scene from Holi


Prev     Next

Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Papa kehte hain bada naam karega...'  Lyricist Majrooh Sultanpuri's words couldn't have been any more prophetic.

Aamir made his full-fledged debut as a young boy in love with the girl of the enemy clan in cousin Mansoor Khan's directorial debut along the lines of Romeo and Juliet.

The actor oozed freshness and vulnerability right from his opening scene at the college farewell party to the final moment of tragedy.

Image: A scene from Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak


Prev     Next

Raakh

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Around 1989 Raakh was slated for a re-release but it didn't materialise. Aditya Bhattacharya's intense film about a young man manipulated by Pankaj Kapur into a web of deceit and blind retribution after his loved one is raped witnessed the first sparks of Aamir Khan's willingness to push the envelope.

It also fetched him a National award for his convincing delivery.

Though he disregards most popular awards and doesn't attend any related function, he values his wins by the government or prestigious acclaims from overseas.

Image: A scene from Raakh


Prev     Next

Deewana Mujhsa Nahi

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Aamir has openly expressed his admiration for Shammi Kapoor.

The late Yahoo star appears to be the actor's inspiration behind such dynamic display of persuasion to serenade Madhuri Dixit's heart by hook or crook as he tosses her all over the landmarks of Ooty with acrobatic moves in the supremely infectious title track of Deewana Mujhsa Nahin (also an unforgettable Shammi Kapoor melody from Teesri Manzil).

The movie bombed but AK's furious dance is etched in every1990-buffs memory.

Image: A scene from Deewana Mujhsa Nahi


Prev     Next

Dil

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
The couple reunited more successfully for Indra Kumar's Dil, which shifts from a typical cat and mouse college caper to high-pitched melodrama post-interval.

Apart from its superhit soundtrack, one of Dil's best parts is its happy conclusion at the airport.

The whole 'he rushes to win her back before she leaves the country but just when he thinks it's over she reappears with a smile and all is well again' climax later became the inspiration of films like Aashiqui, Aur Pyaar Ho Gaya, Chalte Chalte, Jaane Tu Yaa Jaane Naa.)


Image: A scene from Dil


Prev     Next

Dil Hai Ki Manta Nahin

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Though inspired by Frank Capra's It Happened One Night, remade previous as Raj Kapoor-Nargis starrer Chori Chori, Dil Hai Ki Manta Nahi primarily rests on the quirks of Aamir Khan's Raghu Jaitley and Pooja Bhatt's bratty demeanor.

Although the film is perpetually brimming with cuteness, their endearing chemistry arrives to its most personal moment while dancing against Hum Hain Rahi Pyaar Ke in a repair garage and a dumbstruck AK's cigarette falls off his mouth.

Image: A scene from Dil Hai Ki Manta Nahin


Prev     Next

Jo Jeeta Wohi Sikander

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
There's something enduring about Jo Jeeta Wohi Sikander.

Besides being a young, exuberant film about tender heartaches, troubles and rivalry, Mansoor Khan also conveys the significance of sportsmanship.

And that's why even though you may know the result, the final cycle race between Aamir's underdog Sanjay 'Sanju' Lal and Rajput's smug Deepak Tijori continues to push your nerves every single time. Change the gear, Sanju? You bet!'

Image: A scene from Jo Jeeta Wohi Sikander


Prev     Next

Hum Hain Rahi Pyaar Ke

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Like Kuch Kuch Hota Hai belongs to Kajol, HHRPK is primarily a platform to showcase Juhi Chawla's vast treasure of comic talents.

But that doesn't undermine Aamir Khan with whom she shared one of the best on-screen chemistries one bit.

On the contrary, his underplaying perfectly complements the zany temperament of his co-star and the mad circumstances and mischief he's forced to embrace in one of his most family-friendly offerings of all-time.

Image: A scene from Hum Hain Rahi Pyaar Ke


Prev     Next

Andaz Apna Apna

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
One could go on and on about the merits of this161 minutes of pure delight starring both the major Khans -- Aamir and Salman.

Both the actors get ample opportunities to flex their skills as the goofy duo Amar and Prem.

But since this feature is about a certain Tillu, here's reminding of when Aamir's comic timing hits an all-time awesome during the moment of revelation -- when Amar finds out about the real Karishma/Raveena. 

Image: A scene from Andaz Apna Apna


Prev     Next

Baazi

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
He shaved his hair and did his eyebrows to pass off as a tempting cabaret dancer in Baazi's Dole Dole, also the only remembered aspect of Ashutosh Gowarikar's lackluster cop drama.

And if his feverish jig cannot give Sheila a run for her money, nothing will.

Image: A scene from Baazi


Prev     Next

Rangeela

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Munna ranks easily among Aamir Khan's top five performances.

When one of the most sweet-looking faces transformed into a shabby, smart-talking rogue, it was a promising indication of an actor comfortable in his skin, sparkling or otherwise.

The man gives further evidence of this observation by rocking a scene wearing the most outlandish piece of clothing -- canary yellow shirt and pants and placing a restaurant order that is not likely to be forgotten.

Either by the baffled waiter or the chuckling viewer.

Image: A scene from Rangeela

Tags: Rangeela , Munna

Prev     Next

Akele Hum Akele Tum

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Although the film draws unabashed inspiration from Kramer Vs Kramer, Aamir Khan and Manisha Koirala's poignant performances coupled with a breezy soundtrack makes this kerchief caper worth its while.

As impressive Aamir is in the emotional scenes in the courtroom or while bonding with his young boy, it's his utter exasperation at a composer duo (he plays a struggling playback singer) who intentionally needle him leading to an outburst in song -- Chehra Gulabi Nazre Sharaabi, which is both moving and whistle-inducing.

Image: A scene from Akele Hum Akele Tum


Prev     Next

Raja Hindustani

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Long before Emraan Hashmi earned a reputation; Aamir Khan and Karisma Kapoor locked their lips in a nearly minute long kiss for Dharmesh Darshan's huge hit, Raja Hindustani.

Apart from Kapoor's metamorphosis from a tacky leading lady to a demure A-lister, the above is what RH remains most talked about, encouraging more and more top stars to shed their inhibitions.

Image: A scene from Raja Hindustani


Prev     Next

Ghulam

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Apart from his deadly train stunt, which he performed without any doubles, Aamir Khan's performance in Ghulam has one more attribute to boast about.

His debut as playback singer -- the actor's rendition of Aati kya Khandala is pretty much the Kolaveri of its time what with every radio, TV channel and college stud finding an excuse to play it on air or their lips.

Image: A scene from Ghulam


Prev     Next

1947: Earth

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
This predilection for broadening his horizons as an actor led him to sign the first installment of Deepa Mehta's elements trilogy (Earth, Fire, Water).

His transformation from a passionate but well-meaning ice candy vendor Dil Nawaz to a resentful, ruthless extremist earned him tremendous accolades.

He's particularly chilly, with a mix of guilt and poison in his eyes, around the betrayal scene where he gives away Nandita Das's whereabouts to a bunch of fundamentalists leading to her brutal ruin.

Image: A scene from 1947: Earth


Prev     Next

Sarfarosh

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
John Mathew Matthan's taut and sharp film about a cop trying to crack the roots of terror within his country boasts of yet another winner from Khan.

His tenacity is particularly overwhelming in the powerful dialogues which convey his sincerity as a sensible and dedicated IPS officer who dumped a more cushiony post in IAS because of his firm belief: Yeh mere mulk ka mamla hai.

Image: A scene from Sarfarosh


Prev     Next

Lagaan

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
In Aamir Khan's Oscar-nominated Lagaan directed with a lot of love and care by Ashutosh Gowarikar, triumph of spirit underlines the essence of the filmmaking and its contents.

Lagaan,
with its bucolic setting, substantial length, a cast of virtual nobodies and a cricket theme was never a favorable proposition.

But the minute Aamir Khan's Bhuvan declares Sarat Manjoor Hai (I accept the challenge) without batting as much as an eyelid; you know you're getting much, much more than your money's worth.

Image: A scene from Lagaan


Prev     Next

Dil Chahta Hai

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
It's this warm, playful bonding and Farhan Akhtar's nifty writing that's bound us to Akash (Aamir Khan), Sid (Akshaye Khanna) and Sameer (Saif Ali Khan) for good.

Let's just pray no one ever makes its sequel, remake, 3D version (Sameer may have just snorted to that one) or the ilk. Why?

Because 'Waise Bhi Perfection Ko Improve Karna Mushkil Hota Hai.'

Image: A scene from Dil Chahta Hai


Prev     Next

Rang De Basanti

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Aamir finds another band of brothers in Rakyesh Omprakash Mehra's acclaimed drama about the youth revolting against corruption the aggressive way.

Despite his haggard looks, Aamir works well as the fun-loving, flirtatious DJ who goes on from humming 'Sue kar mere mann ko' to taking on the system to meet tragic results in one of the finest films of 2006.

Image: A scene from Rang De Basanti


Prev     Next

Taare Zameen Par

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Apart from doing a remarkable job as a first-time director, Aamir Khan lends able support to play an arts teacher in Taare Zameen Par, which talks about parenting and dyslexia.

The actor comes up with a creative discussion during one of his classroom sessions when his idealistic character cleverly communicates how dyslexia can be easily overcome through the examples of famous names like Albert Einstein, Agatha Christie and even Abhishek Bachchan.

Image: A scene from Taare Zameen Par


Prev     Next

Ghajini

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Size does not matter. A beefed up Aamir convincingly takes on a bunch of burly baddies to avenge the brutal murder of his girl despite a sporadic amnesia ailment in style in the Hindi remake of Ghajini. In one scene, after beating all evil hard and blue he forgets again -- standing right behind the titular villain -- only to retrieve his memory back in the nick of time and save the day.

Any other actor in his place would have signed up for ten more Ghajinis but AK's next role was an engineering student in Rajkumar Hirani's 3 Idiots.

Image: A scene from Ghajini


Prev     Next

3 Idiots

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Khan's fondness for playing the leader of young pack continues as he plays a 40-something passed off for a college student in the highest-grossing Bollywood film by Rajkumar Hirani.

Apart from its obvious idealism, it's Aamir's aptitude for get-ups including an almost believable caricature of Boman Irani's Viru Sahastrabudhhe that makes Rancho Shamaldas Chanchad aka Phunsukh Wangdu such a fun guy to have around.

Image: A scene from 3 Idiots


Prev     Next

Dhobi Ghat

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
In the last couple of years a lot of unusual stuff has happened, Salman Khan turned into Bollywood's idea of Rajnikant, Shah Rukh Khan actually kissed on big screen and Aamir uttered the four-lettered word for his wife's directorial debut.

It's nothing over-the-top but one thing's for sure -- Master Ratan has grown up.

Image: A scene from Dhobi Ghat

Tags: Bollywood

Prev     Next

Delhi Belly

Prev     More
Prev

More
He goes a step further to slyly include (and approve) a frequently used desi expletive in the DK Bose track for his home production, Delhi Belly and even performs a flamboyant item song (I hate you like I love you) to pay a 'dhinchak' tribute to some of the iconic dancers of Hindi films.

In his own words, 'I have copied Amitji's hairstyle, Govinda and Mithunda's dance style. Hair on my chest is from Anilji and the dressing is an amalgamation of all.'

Image: A scene from Delhi Belly


Prev     More