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Let the army do its job, please

Last updated on: July 25, 2016 15:36 IST

The military leadership, soldiers and indeed all security forces continue to battle difficult circumstances in Kashmir. Let’s not add to their woes by spreading half-baked stories, factually incorrect posts and inaccurate articles, says Nitin A Gokhale.

 

Last week, Captain Amarinder Singh, Maharaja of Patiala, soldier and now politician, wrote a heartfelt piece batting for the Indian soldier deployed in Kashmir (external link) and berated the political as well as military leadership. The burden of his lament was: The Indian Army in Kashmir has been de-fanged and is fast becoming an “army of girl guides.” The article immediately gained currency and wide circulation, especially among retired faujis, already angry with the government for various alleged sins of commission and omission on One Rank One Pension and the Seventh Pay Commission issues.

Captain Amarinder had some valid points in his piece, written more as a soldier that he was. However, the politician in him could not resist the temptation of taking pot shots at the current leadership. “The government of India must allow freedom of action to the army. The directive must be just one: ‘Bring a situation in the state where the writ of India runs and not that of the Inter-Services Intelligence,’ he wrote, hinting that the current government at the Centre which has an alliance with the Peoples Democratic Party in Jammu and Kashmir was going soft on militancy in Kashmir. He was being economical with the truth.

But more of the status of counter-insurgency a little later.

Coming back to Capt Amarinder’s piece. As a political leader, he has the liberty and right to criticise opponents. The sad part is he has used the army and its so-called lapses to hit out at the political leadership. “For instance, in Budgam when a car broke through a military checkpoint in November 2014, the soldiers manning the post opened fire, as was their duty. One officer and eight jawans were court-martialed and imprisoned. Penalising soldiers for doing what was expected of them is unacceptable. It is for the chief and his northern army commander to stand by their men in the difficult duty they are performing and not succumb to political pressures,” Capt Amarinder writes in support of his criticism. 

However, as it turns out, no such court martial took place. The army’s northern command, which has been at the forefront of the counter-insurgency operations in Jammu and Kashmir came up with an official denial on its Twitter handle. It said: “No army soldier, officer court martialed/ imprisoned in the Budgam incident of November 2014,” giving lie to the good Captain’s assertion.

However, the clarification notwithstanding, a large number of Whatsapp messages, Google groups and Twitter handles started taking the army to task for punishing the soldiers once again highlighting the dangers of depending on unverified posts/reports to express opinions that spread confusion among the serving ranks of the military and demoralising them.

Last month, at a seminar on ‘Social Media and the Military at Chandigarh’, I have had an occasion to point out to this pitfall. There I cited an example of how some months ago, a senior veteran criticised the ministry of defence for deciding to appoint ‘outsiders’ to sit on promotion boards of senior military commanders. Again, the article was written without bothering to cross-check facts. There was no such decision taken and yet, the article got widely circulated giving false impression and further adding to the already existing negative sentiments against the ‘civilian’ in military minds.

Other such examples of misleading, untrue posts doing the rounds abound but suffice it to say that veterans -- many of whom are active keyboard warriors now -- may need to pause a bit and rethink about the propensity of using the stratagem of ‘forwarded as received.’ It is easy to morph, amend, twist articles, photos and posts because of improved technology and faster communication, thanks to the ‘mobile republic’ that India has become. A civilian forwarding a post about the military will not be taken as seriously as a veteran’s forward would be.

The veterans, I feel, have a great responsibility to support the organisation that they served with dedication and loyalty. Please level constructive criticism by all means. But please also have faith in the current leadership which may be faced with new challenges and circumstances, the old timers never had to face.

The military too needs to reach out to veterans and keep the community informed about various new initiatives and developments concerning the organisations. As I mentioned in Chandigarh last month, every Command and, of course, service HQs should think of a ‘communication cell’ where veterans active in the traditional media and on social media can post their queries and clarify doubts so that gaffes that keep occurring because of misinformation/disinformation are kept to a minimum.

Coming back to the current situation in Jammu and Kashmir. The army has studiously kept itself away from the current law and order issue in Kashmir valley where protesters have been on a rampage in the wake of the killing of Burhan Wani, a self-proclaimed terrorist.

In one instance, the army patrol, when faced with a riot-like situation, followed the standard operating procedure of warning the crowd before firing at the crowd that tried to snatch weapons from the soldiers. Unlike the police and central armed police forces, the army has to shoot to kill which is exactly what the patrol did.

A closer look at figures pertaining to counter-insurgency operations this year is also revealing. According to official figures, since January to July 24, 2016 the security forces have eliminated 85 terrorists as compared to 43 for the corresponding period in 2015 while 17 have been caught as compared to just five last year. That Pakistan has once again ‘opened the tap’ in pushing in terrorists into Jammu and Kashmir is evident from the fact that there have been over a dozen infiltration attempts from January to July.  

Ten soldiers have already died defending the country this year so far and this is not counting police and Central Armed Police Forces personnel who laid down their lives during their duty in Jammu-Kashmir.

Clearly, there is no let up in Pakistan’s attempt to stir trouble in J-K, especially in the KashmirValley.  And of course, there is no policy to rein in the army and appease terrorists. 

The Indian Army has stood firm for over quarter of a century in thwarting this attempt. The military leadership, soldiers and indeed all security forces continue to battle difficult circumstances in Kashmir. Let’s not add to their woes by spreading half-baked stories, factually incorrect posts and inaccurate articles. 

-- The author is a national security expert and founder of BharatShakti.in

Nitin A Gokhale