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Rediff.com  » News » In PHOTOS: It's an odd, crazy world out there

In PHOTOS: It's an odd, crazy world out there

Last updated on: February 4, 2011 08:46 IST

In PHOTOS: It's an odd, crazy world out there

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We bring for you a collection of some of the odd, crazy moments from around the world in recent weeks

A Fiat 500 gripped by an aluminum hand is seen in Italian artist Lorenzo Quinn's sculpture Vroom Vroom in London January 24, 2011. Quinn is the son of late actor Anthony Quinn.

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Photographs: Stefan Wermuth/Reuters
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A boy holds on to the door as he shouts slogans during an anti-government demonstration in central Tunis.


Photographs: Zohra Bensemra/Reuters
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Sergey Kaunov, a member of a local winter swimmers' club, carries his bride Irina Kuzmenko out of water as they celebrate their wedding on the bank of Yenisey River where the air temperature was about -30 degrees Celsius (-22 degree Fahrenheit) in the Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk. Irina does not practice winter bathing, but she did it on the day of their wedding after heating up in a sauna.


Photographs: Ilya Naymushin/Reuters
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A toy inside a Volkswagen Beetle is seen during the celebrations of the National day of the Beetle in Sao Bernardo do Campo . Owners of Volkswagen Beetles come together during this annual event which celebrates the car's history in Brazil's automobile industry.


Photographs: Fernando Donasci/Reuters
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Performers wait before taking part in the opening ceremony of Aqua City, a new flagship attraction at the Hong Kong Ocean Park.


Photographs: Bobby Yip/Reuters
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A riot police officer falls down accidentally near the Congress building in Tegucigalpa, as other officers prepare for protests by opposition groups. The groups will protest against the government of President Porfirio Lobo, who will begin his second year of his four-year term as president.


Photographs: Edgard Garrido/Reuters
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A five-month-old tiger cub looks at a rabbit in Jiufeng Forest Zoo in Wuhan, Hubei province. The rabbit was put in the enclosure as a training exercise for the tiger to stimulate its hunting instinct, local media reported


Photographs: Reuters
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A zookeeper feeds a Rothschild giraffe in its enclosure at Prague Zoo.


Photographs: David W Cerny/Reuters
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Google Inc.'s new offices are seen in Venice, Los Angeles, California. Google is leasing more than 100,000 square feet in the building, which includes the Binoculars Building designed by Frank Gehry, and will move employees in this year, reported the Los Angeles Times.


Photographs: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters
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French "Spiderman" Alain Robert climbs the 137-metres-high (about 450 feet) Hang Seng Bank headquarters at Hong Kong's financial Central district.


Photographs: Bobby Yip/Reuters
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Fully clothed human remains, representing some of the world's best-preserved bodies, are displayed at the Capuchin Catacombs in Palermo, southern Italy.

The catacombs, frequented by tourists, contain thousands of remains of clerics, nobility, and families of local citizens dating from about the mid-16th century, well preserved due to an ancient and highly effective embalming process.

Originally intended for friars of the Capuchin monastery, the catacombs evolved, with the aid of donations, into a place where family members would visit, spend time with and even change the clothes of the deceased. The last burial was Rosalia Lombardo, two-years old, in the 1920s.


Photographs: Tony Gentile/Reuters
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