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What India thinks about sex, cheating and homosexuality

Last updated on: April 23, 2014 18:18 IST

What India thinks about sex, cheating and homosexuality

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A 'Global Attitudes' survey of 40 countries has revealed startling facts on where they stand on moral issues like pre-marital sex, homosexuality and use of contraceptives, among others.

US-based Pew Research Center had conducted a Global Attitudes survey in which it asked people from 40 countries, including India to share their views on eight topics of moral importance -- extramarital affairs, gambling, homosexuality, abortion, premarital sex, alcohol consumption, divorce, and the use of contraceptives.

40,117 respondents participated in the worldwide survey, the results of which were released last week.

Interestingly, India is the second country to be more accepting of extra-marital affairs, after Czech Republic, the morality survey revealed.

According to the survey, about 14 per cent respondents from India believed that it was 'morally acceptable' to have an affair outside of their marriage.

Want to know how Indians responded to other questions on morality and how other countries fared in the list? 

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Image: Where does India stand on moral issues vs rest of the world? Find out!
Photographs: Andrew Biraj/Reuters

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Use of contraceptives

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How Indians responded:

Morally acceptable: 59 per cent

Morally unacceptable: 22 per cent

Not a moral issue: 7 per cent

Depends on the situation (Volunteered): 7 per cent

Don't know/Refused: 4 per cent

Moral vs Immoral: Global view

With 65 per cent respondents voting against contraception, Pakistan topped the list of countries that found it immoral to use contraceptives.

With 82 per cent respondents voting for it, Venezula topped the list of countries that found the use of contraceptive methods morally acceptable.

Globally, 14 per cent respondents thought using contraceptives was unacceptable, while 54 per cent thought it was acceptable; 21 per cent felt it was not a moral issue at all.

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Image: 59 per cent Indians found it morally acceptable to use contraceptives.
Photographs: Javer/ Creative Commons

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Pre-marital sex

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How Indians responded:

Morally acceptable: 10 per cent

Morally unacceptable: 67 per cent

Not a moral issue: 11 per cent

Depends on the situation (Volunteered): 4 per cent

Don't know/Refused: 8 per cent

Moral vs Immoral: Global view

Indonesia topped the list of countries opposing pre-marital sex. 97 per cent respondents felt it was immoral to engage in sex before marriage.

Meanwhile Czech Republic (67 per cent), topped the list of countries that endorsed the idea by voting in its favour.

Globally, 46 per cent respondents found it morally unacceptable while 24 per cent thought it was acceptable; 16 per cent felt it was not a moral issue.

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Image: 67 per cent Indians thought that it was immoral to indulge in pre-marital sex.
Photographs: t69 on Flickr.com/Wikimedia Commons

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Abortion

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How Indians responded

Morally acceptable: 17 per cent

Morally unacceptable: 58 per cent

Not a moral issue: 10 per cent

Depends on the situation (Volunteered): 12 per cent

Don't know/Refused: 4 per cent

Moral vs Immoral: Global view

Philippines (93 per cent) topped the list of countries that found it morally unacceptable to abort.

On the other end of the spectrum was Czech Republic. 49 per cent Czech respondents felt it was morally acceptable to abort.

Globally, 56 per cent respondents found abortion unacceptable, 15 per cent found it acceptable; 12 per cent did not think it was a moral issue.

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Image: More than 50 per cent Indians thought it was immoral to go for abortion, while 17 per cent voted in its favour.
Photographs: Jackson Latka/Creative Commons

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Homosexuality

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How Indians responded:

Morally acceptable: 9 per cent

Morally unacceptable: 67 per cent

Not a moral issue: 11 per cent

Depends on the situation (Volunteered): 3 per cent

Don't know /Refused: 11 per cent

Moral vs Immoral: Global view

Ghana (98 per cent) dominated the list of countries that found it morally unacceptable to indulge in homosexuality, while Czech Republic (56 per cent) was the most liberal in the list by voting it 'morally acceptable'.

Globally, 59 per cent respondents found homosexuality unacceptable, only 20 per cent found it unacceptable; 13 per cent felt it was not a moral issue.

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Image: A frugal 9 per cent voted in favour of homosexuality, while 67 per cent Indians termed it 'morally unacceptable'.
Photographs: Jackson Latka/Creative Commons

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Extra-marital affairs

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How Indians responded:

Morally acceptable: 14 per cent

Morally unacceptable: 62 per cent

Not a moral issue: 13 per cent

Depends on the situation (Volunteered): 5 per cent

Don't know /Refused: 7 per cent

Moral vs Immoral: Global view

Palestinian territories (94 per cent) topped the list of countries that found extra-marital affairs unacceptable, while Czech Republic (17 per cent), India (14 per cent) and Chile (13 per cent) were the top three countries that found it acceptable to indulge in an affair outside of the marriage.

Globally, 78 per cent respondents worldwide felt that it was morally unacceptable to have an extra-marital affair; only 7 per cent felt it was acceptable and 10 per cent felt it was not a moral issue at all.

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Image: India is the second-most country accepting of extra marital affairs in the world, the survey revealed
Photographs: Jackson Latka/Creative Commons

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Getting a divorce

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How Indians responded:

Morally acceptable: 18 per cent

Morally unacceptable: 53 per cent

Not a moral issue:  10 per cent

Depends on the situation (Volunteered): 16 per cent

Don’t know/Refused: 3 per cent

Moral vs Immoral: Global view

Ghana (80 per cent) topped the list of countries that found divorce to be morally unacceptable.

At the other end of the spectrum was Chile where 64 per cent respondents found divorce morally acceptable.

Meanwhile, the global average is quite balanced with 36 per cent respondents finding it morally acceptable and 24 per cent finding it unacceptable; 22 per cent felt it was not a moral issue at all.

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Image: 53 per cent Indians felt that it was immoral to file for divorce.
Photographs: Chris Keane/Reuters
Tags: Chile

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Consumption of alcohol

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How Indians responded:

Morally acceptable: 10 per cent

Morally unacceptable: 66 per cent

Not a moral issue: 16 per cent

Depends on the situation (Volunteered): 4 per cent

Don't know/Refused: 4 per cent

Moral vs Immoral: Global view

With 94 per cent respondents voting against alcohol consumption, Pakistan topped the list of countries that found it morally unacceptable to consume alcohol.

Most respondents in Japan (66 per cent) thought it was morally acceptable to have alcohol.

The global average revealed that 42 per cent respondents found it immoral to consume alcohol. 22 per cent respondents felt it was acceptable to have alcohol while 24 per cent did not even consider it as a moral issue.

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Image: More than 60 per cent Indians felt it was morally not acceptable to consume alcohol.
Photographs: Victor Fraile/Reuters

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Gambling

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How Indians responded:

Morally acceptable: 7 per cent

Morally unacceptable: 69 per cent

Not a moral issue: 16 per cent

Depends on the situation (Volunteered): 3 per cent

Don't know /Refused: 4 per cent

Moral vs Immoral: Global view

Pakistan dominated the list of countries that found it morally unacceptable to indulge in gambling, with 95 per cent respondents voting against the practice.

While, 38 per cent respondents in Japan endorsing it, topping the list of countries in which gambling was considered morally acceptable.

The world average revealed that 62 per cent respondents found it morally unacceptable to gamble. Only 11 per cent respondents found it acceptable while the remaining 19 per cent did not think of gambling as a moral issue.


Image: Sixty nine per cent Indians thought it was morally unacceptable to gamble.
Photographs: Jean-Philippe Arles/Reuters

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