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Why majority of Indians want to work abroad

Last updated on: January 6, 2012 11:53 IST

Why majority of Indians want to work abroad

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BS Reporter in New Delhi

The majority of younger employees are keen on seeking jobs abroad, according to the latest findings of Ma Foi Randstad Workmonitor Survey 2011-Wave4.

India, with an index of 144, tops the global mobility index, followed by Brazil (129) and China (125), meaning more and more Indians wish to go to foreign nations for employment.

The survey, a quarterly review of the 'mental mobility status' of employees further said 39 per cent of employees with low education levels would move abroad just for a better suited job that doesn't come with a pay rise.

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Image: India tops the global mobility index.
Photographs: Reuters

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A significantly larger proportion of employees with higher education levels (60 per cent) were willing to move abroad for a better suited job even if the salary remained the same.

Men (79 per cent) outnumber women (65 per cent) in the expectation of going abroad for work that promises higher pay.

Among Indians, 45 per cent of the workforce believed in a focus on promotion and 34 per cent believed in doing something different.

This trend was consistent among all workgroups, based on income, location, gender, type of employment and such others.

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Image: Employees with higher education level want to move abroad even if the salary remained the same.
Photographs: Reuters
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Surprisingly, the survey said 2011 was considered a good year financially by people across the four metro locations of Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore and Kolkata.

The finding suggests those with annual salaries above Rs 10,00,000 aspired for higher financial performance for their organisations.

Those in lower income groups felt their organisation did well financially in 2011.

E Balaji, Managing Director, Ma Foi Randstad, said: "Burgeoning opportunities have created a major change in the mindset of young employees.

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Image: Opportunities have created a major change in the mindset, says Balaji.
Photographs: Reuters

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"While money is an important driver for Gen Y, they are also driven by work place flexibility, the right culture, challenging work roles, career growth opportunities and bosses with an inspirational approach towards work.

"Companies should re-orient their work culture to address employee needs, to succeed in the emerging war for talent, which will be key to retain their position in the marketplace."

The survey found no slowing of job mobility intent in the Indian subcontinent.

The mobility index was least in Luxembourg, with Germany and Italy next, indicating least employee churn.

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Image: Luxembourg reported least employee churn.


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The global survey gives a mixed picture for employee outlook in 2012. In most countries round the globe, employees feel slightly positive about 2012.

In 18 of 30 countries surveyed, respondents felt their employer was entering a better year financially, compared to 2011. In addition, employees in most nations believed their salary did not reflect their performance.

This was as high as 81 per cent in Greece and 79 per cent in Poland and Hungary. A little more than 80 per cent of employees in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, India and Mexico expect a pay rise and bonus.

The numbers in India were found to be highest (83 per cent) among temporary staff.


Image: Majority of employees in Argentina expect pay rise and bonus. A view of capital Buenos Aires.


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