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Vote! Your Favourite James Bond film!

Last updated on: July 22, 2011 13:02 IST

Vote! Your Favourite James Bond film!

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Sukanya Verma in Mumbai

You don't have to be drunk on martini to acknowledge him as the ultimate icon of suave, sexy and sleek paraphernalia that embodies a persona men idolize and women swoon over. No small feat to achieve, agree? But then is he not 'Bond, James Bond?'

For almost five decades, the cinematic avatar of Ian Fleming's debonair creation has fascinated viewers with his elegantly-executed escapades. The MI6 agent's lavish lifestyle and unfazed poise boosted by his workmanship around the ladies, penchant for gizmos and endless supply of saucy one-liners  even as he saves the day bumping off high-profile bad guys across the globe makes him a darling in the realm of fictional characters.

With Star Movies celebrating the distinguished spy's franchise with its ongoing 'Forever Bond' series, here's a chance to vote for your favourite 007 among 10 of his most popular works.

Dr No, 1962

The one that started it all.

Dr No marks the screen debut of Bond and a decidedly low key one at that, both in budget and buzz. That doesn't make it any less special though. Ask Ramesh Sippy, among many other James Bond influences, Shakaal's underwater hideaway in Shaan was inspired from Dr No's lair in Crab Key Island.

Meanwhile, Sean Connery's sophisticated looks, subtle sexuality in addition to a cool, calculated wit render 007's exploits all the more delightful as he juggles between serenading hot babes, disposing bad guys and creepy tarantulas. And for all those reasons and more, namely, Ursula Andress and her legendary bikini-on-the-beach appearance, Dr No is essential Bond viewing. 

Bond-liner: That's a Smith & Wesson, and you've had your six.


Image: A still from Dr No

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From Russia with Love, 1963

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Globetrotting is one of his many hobbies. And so it's no surprise to see Italy, Turkey and Scotland on the British Top Agent's no-second-to-spare menu while Connery's Bond strives to retrieve a much sought-after decoding device before the baddie does. All the better if it includes rescuing a Russian damsel-in-distress, right 007? 

Against the backdrop of John Barry's magnificent soundtrack and timeless theme, director Terence Young constructs edge-of-the-seat action drama involving choppers, chases and characters that enliven the drama within Orient Express, Istanbul and Venice while maintaining a credible, intelligent tone.

Bond-liner: I think I got it without the subtitles.


Image: A still from From Russia, With Love

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Goldfinger, 1964

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Like the tagline predicted, 'Everything he touches turns into excitement,' Goldfinger's resounding success and enduring specifics set the bar for what to expect from a Bond flick. It also single-handedly catapulted Connery, silver-screen's best loved Bond, to megastar status. Not bad for a film named after its gold-gripped antagonist?

From fiercely choreographed action scenes (but of course featuring an Ashton Martin) to the startling image of a dead woman painted in gold to Bond's flirtations with a feisty femme fatale named, er, Pussy Galore to Shirley Bassey's gingerly rendition of the title track, Goldfinger is that ultimate 007 treat you cannot afford to miss.

Bond-liner: You're a woman of many parts, Pussy!


Image: A still from Goldfinger

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You Only Live Twice, 1967

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Even Wallace & Gromit could learn a thing or two about building cool gadgets given the number of secret passages and mysterious door traps depicted in You Only Live Twice. This time the action shifts to Tokyo as James Bond finds himself investigating the mastermind behind an American spacecraft hijacking.

When not ninja training to avert a nuclear war intended by the ever-so bald and malicious Blofeld, the super spy finds enough time to seek pleasure and soak in the flavours of Japanese culture. Despite the incredulity of it all, there's never a dull moment in Sean Connery's snazzy cocktail of shaken, not stirred.

Bond-liner: Uggghhh... Siamese vodka?


Image: A still from You Only Live Twice

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On Your Majesty's Secret Service, 1969

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Following Connery's decision to step out of 007's shoes, several actors were approached to replace him. Eventually model-turned-actor George

Lazenby was signed up for the part, also his only turn as James Bond.

Apart from the standard Bond fix -- spell-binding action, spectacle with a bonus of Blofeld's entranced army of Angels of Death, On Your Majesty's Secret Service took a slight detour to set a tender tone. The one where Bond gives up his casanova ways to marry Tracy, played by the lovely Diana Riggs, not realising the tragic fate to follow their union. Though the restrained representation of the events was appreciated by most, Lazenby's handsome disposition was not nearly enough to make a Bond of substance. 

Bond-liner: We have all the time in the world.


Image: A still from On Your Majesty's Secret Service

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On Your Majesty's Secret Service, 1969

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Following Connery's decision to step out of 007's shoes, several actors were approached to replace him. Eventually model-turned-actor George

Lazenby was signed up for the part, also his only turn as James Bond.

Apart from the standard Bond fix -- spell-binding action, spectacle with a bonus of Blofeld's entranced army of Angels of Death, On Your Majesty's Secret Service took a slight detour to set a tender tone. The one where Bond gives up his casanova ways to marry Tracy, played by the lovely Diana Riggs, not realising the tragic fate to follow their union. Though the restrained representation of the events was appreciated by most, Lazenby's handsome disposition was not nearly enough to make a Bond of substance. 

Bond-liner: We have all the time in the world.


Image: A still from On Your Majesty's Secret Service

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The Spy Who Loved Me, 1977

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It's all about missing submarines, US-Soviet conflicts, large-scale explosions, jaw-dropping action snow/air/road/rail/underwater), a crazy guy wanting to rule the world, exotic beauties, ready to drop clothes and country-hopping in 007 flicks. The Spy Who Loved Me has all this and more.

No, it's nothing to do Roger Moore, although majority would acquiesce this to be the best amongst his contributions. And while Moore does an acceptable job of serving 007, it's the exquisite allure of Bond girl, Barbara Bach, deftly choreographed stunts, elaborate sets and the unforgettable sidekick Jaws with his giant frame and stern steel pearlies lend the entertainer some of its greatest highs. 

Bond-liner: He just dropped in for a quick bite.


Image: A still from The Spy Who Loved Me

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Moonraker, 1979

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Speak of the devil and Jaws is back in yet another fast-paced edition of James Bond fare. Only this time, he finally agrees to be an (mostly comical) aid to 007 who's investigating the workings of shuttle manufacturing enterprise.

More sci-fi than spy, this visual spectacle has Bond scuttling between space as well as Rio Di Janeiro and Venice doing the usual, blasting the baddies thousand feet above ground level atop two cable cars, motor-boat chases, sky-diving, the action's more graphic than ever and the ladies keep the temperature soaring regardless of Moore's lukewarm presence. Mildly criticized by critics, Moonraker had a good run at the BO.

Bond-liner: Bollinger? If it's '69 you were expecting me.


Image: A still from Moonraker

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For Your Eyes Only, 1981

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Bond is assigned the task of getting back a missing missile communication contraption even as he struggles to find the real hitch in an on-going game of blame and power struggle. Well, this is James Bond and his constant ally service in the garb of exotic hotties and electronic wizardry never lets him down.

Shot in extensively in Greece, Italy and Bahamas among other locations, this Roger Moore helmed espionage actioner is delectably high on a fast-paced thrilling skiing sequence, car chases, aerial stunts, stunning underwater run-ins as well as some old school bang bang.

Interestingly, For Your Eyes Only also starred Cassandra Harris, the future (now deceased) wife of Pierce Brosnan, the two met of the sets of the said film. Later as we all know, Brosnan went on to play 007 in four films. 

Bond-liner: I'm afraid we're being out-horse-powered!


Image: A still from For Your Eyes Only

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GoldenEye, 1995

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The James Bond franchise took a backseat after a mostly unenthusiastic response to Timothy Dalton's take of the same. Finally in 1995, Pierce Brosnan who'd been in the running to play the legendary spy since a decade back but was held back owing to his contract with the makers of detective TV series, Remington Steele, was on board to say those iconic lines.

Brosnan's irresistible charm, well-timed wit and simmering intensity, one had sampled it long enough as Steele to not know better, led supporters to believe the man was born to play 007. 

His compelling work in the swift and sassy GoldenEye, replete with a groovy title track by Tina Turner, gorgeous but feistier-than-ever Bond women, including Judi Dench as M, met with enough critical and commercial appreciation to refute this
endorsement.

Bond-liner: James Bond, stiff-ass Brit.


Image: A still from GoldenEye

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Casino Royale, 2006

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Considerable skepticism surrounded Daniel Craig's casting as Bond. Any such misgiving, however, was tossed out of the window after the English actor's effective portrayal of the charismatic spy, second only to Connery, resulting in Casino Royale as a top grosser of the franchise.

Breaking from the somewhat formulaic structure of the previous films, Casino Royale dwells into Bond origins, acquainting us with the vulnerable and volatile side of the world's most famous gentleman. Apart from some superlative daredevilry, glossy visuals and nifty narrative, this one witnesses Bond love, lose and loathe like never before. Too bad it had to be followed with an utterly 'meh' Quantum of Solace. Craig is slated to resume his duties as 007 sometime in the near future.

Bond-Liner: I'm sorry I'm not sorry.


Image: A still from Casino Royale

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