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Getting ready for the filmmakers of tomorrow

Last updated on: March 17, 2011 16:29 IST

Getting ready for the filmmakers of tomorrow

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N Ganesh in Mumbai

Here's what your favourite celebrities have been up to.

Quite a few directors like Anurag Kashyap (Black Friday, Dev D, Gulaal), Nikhil Advani (Kal Ho Naa Ho, Salaam-e-Ishq, Chandni Chowk to China, Patiala House) and Vijay Krishna Acharya (Tashan, Dhoom 3) turned up for the special screening of a short film called Jaan, Shaan and Maan, made by children, at Mehboob Studio in Bandra, a western suburb of Mumbai.

The children, in fact, are juvenile offenders of the city, who have been given a chance to tell their stories via the film medium. Aangan has equipped these children with the basic knowledge and tools of filmmaking.


Image: Anurag Kashyap, Nikhil Advani and Vikramaditya Motwane
Photographs: Pradeep Bandekar
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"The idea to involve the children in filmmaking was merely an exercise that would give them an opportunity to introspect. It was never meant to be what it has now turned out to be," said Pramod Pathak, filmmaker and actor who coordinated with the children for the film, made on a shoestring budget.

"The subject was one that they could easily relate to. The film depicts the circumstances that trigger children to be in conflict with the law, making them end up in observation homes," said Pathak.

The first attempt was done with a handycam, much to the disappointment of the children, who expected to be working in film sets, and hobnob with the big names of the industry.

"Their enthusiasm waned when they realised that this was not a full length feature film and that it lacked the glamour associated with films," said Pathak.


Image: Shaad Ali

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When the final product of two months of effort was shown to organisers, they realised the film was gripping but could be improved if they were shot with professional filmmaking equipment.

"I expected the children to protest the suggestion of shooting again. I broached the subject by telling them their film has been well appreciated and needs to be improved. They were game for it and their enthusiasm and level of involvement was more than the first attempt," recalled Pathak.

Kiran Rao, whose delay had held up the screening, said that she was overwhelmed by the film. "Most of us feel crime is a subject matter of the police. Most of us think that children having a conflict with law must be put away. I now see with much more clarity how we are all interconnected. These are our children and our responsibility," she said.


Image: Kiran Rao

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