rediff.com

NewsApp (Free)

Read news as it happens
Download NewsApp

Available on  

Rediff News  All News 
Rediff.com  » Getahead » Love and money: These myths can hurt your marriage

Love and money: These myths can hurt your marriage

June 13, 2014 12:01 IST

Love and money: These myths can hurt your marriage

     Next

Next
Morningstar.in

Some interesting observations from an expert on wealth and psychology

Columnist and author Mark Miller spoke to Kathleen Burns Kingsbury, who is also an author and an expert on wealth and psychology. The interview appeared on Morningstar's US website. Presented here is an abbreviated version of her views.

Are there inflection points in life where it's critical for couples to communicate about money?

There are opportunities at every life stage. When couples get engaged and are living together, that's a great starting point -- an opportunity to talk not only about how you want to share your lives together, but how to live well financially.

Estate planning is another important issue, and unfortunately most couples don't do it soon enough. The great opportunity is to have the conversation well before you think you will need it.

A crisis is not the best time for making financial decisions.

We live in a society where talking about money is taboo, even with your significant other. Couples will avoid having financial conversations because they bring on conflict.

Many of us were raised to not talk about money, even with loved ones. That gets in the way of developing a plan, and it gets in the way of honest communication.

Half of first marriages end in divorce, and one of the key issues people always raise is financial conflict.

On common myths regarding couples and money.

Courtesy 

Please click NEXT to continue reading

 


Photographs: Dominic Xavier/Rediff.com

     Next

Myth: Love conquers all

Prev     Next
Prev

Next

We're told that if you absolutely love someone, that conquers all. But you can love someone and be very different financially.

That's not necessarily bad, but if you can't work it through, that causes conflict and split-ups. Moving to mature love is learning how to negotiate, talk, and manage together.

Please click NEXT to continue reading


Photographs: David Ball/Wikimedia Commons
Tags: 1

Prev     Next

Myth: Love means never having to say you're sorry

Prev     Next
Prev

Next

Saying "I'm sorry" when there's a disagreement is really important as a way to forgive and move on. A great gift you can give your partner, if you get upset with something he or she has done with money, is to be able to look at why it was so upsetting for you, given your own history with money.

Couples can talk this through themselves, or an advisor can help them to understand it.

Why is it that a couple has the same fight over and over about what car to buy? Maybe it's not the $30,000 price tag, but how each of them grew up -- in one person's family, a car was something important, and in the other it wasn't.

Please click NEXT to continue reading


Photographs: Dominic Xavier/Rediff.com
Tags: 1

Prev     Next

Myth: Happily married couples are open and honest about money

Prev     Next
Prev

Next

A very high percentage of spouses actually lie about purchases they've made, or hide them. Forty-three per cent of women hide accessory and clothing purchases; men tend to hide music and liquor.

Please click NEXT to continue reading


Photographs: Uttam Ghosh/Rediff.com
Tags: 1

Prev     Next

Myth: Couples should always agree about money

Prev     Next
Prev

Next

First, that almost never happens. And there are some real benefits in having different perspectives about money.

Perhaps one spouse is more of a saver and the other a spender; if you respect the differences, you can learn from one another and draw on one another's strengths.

Over time, you can find some middle ground, where maybe one loosens up and the other learns to save more.

Please click NEXT to continue reading


Photographs: Uttam Ghosh/Rediff.com
Tags: 1

Prev     Next

Myth: Women need to be rescued financially

Prev     Next
Prev

Next

Even some women buy in to the idea that we need to be rescued financially -- we bide our time, have a career, do whatever we need to do to get by, and Prince Charming will save us.

I'm not saying that you shouldn't trust your partner, but you never know what will happen. Divorce or premature death can leave a woman in the driver's seat unexpectedly.

Women are more economically powerful than ever before. We're creating businesses at twice the national rate, and we inherit 70 per cent of the nation's wealth. But many of us have ambivalence about financial power.

Please click NEXT to continue reading


Photographs: Dominic Xavier/Rediff.com
Tags: 1

Prev     Next

Myth: Men are savvy; women are naive

Prev     More
Prev

More

The common assumption is that guys have it together financially and women don't. What ends up happening is men are socialised to not show weakness. They may not understand something, but they're not socialised to ask questions because they think it will make them seem vulnerable.

Four out of 10 women are the primary breadwinners in their households now, and we're moving closer to 50-50.

We assume that means women will act like men when it comes to planning, but women still tend to be more collaborative with money management.

This speaks to the fact that women are socialised differently than men.

It will be interesting to see if there's a change in that approach as women shoulder even more of the income-generating burden in households.


Photographs: Dominic Xavier/Rediff.com
Tags: 1

Prev     More