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Rediff.com  » Business » It's okay to give and accept bribes: Young India

It's okay to give and accept bribes: Young India

Last updated on: May 3, 2011 17:28 IST

It's okay to give and accept bribes: Young India

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Amid the huge protests against rampant corruption in India, here comes a shocking revelation. Around 53 per cent of youngsters believe it is okay to offer bribes and 39 per cent said that it is fine to accept one.

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Image: Youth okay with bribes.

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It's okay to give and accept bribes: Young India

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About 54 per cent admit to have cheated in exams and 35 per cent say it's okay to cheat to do well in their job.

This was revealed in a survey conducted by MTV India among 2,400 youth between the ages of 18-25 across 13 cities.

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Image: 54 per cent admit to have cheated in exams.

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It's okay to give and accept bribes: Young India

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Money is the core issue for youth today with 85 per cent of the respondents feeling that money gives them power.

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Image: Money matters.

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Besides, money is also the most important factor in a job and 90 per cent claim that they want to earn more than their parents.

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Image: money is also the most important factor in a job.

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An alarming fact is that 60 per cent of the youth say they would look for shortcuts to success. Around 47 per cent of the youngsters feel it is okay to offer sexual favours to move up in life.

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Image: 60 per cent of the youth say they would look for shortcuts to success.

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It's okay to give and accept bribes: Young India

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Aditya Swamy, channel head, MTV India, said, "One of the key insights for me was that even for young people, money decides their place in the social ladder. A deeper analysis made us realise this is because today, they are 'experience junkies'. It isn't about what you wear, or what car you drive, but about what all you have done."

The study 'Age of Sinnocence' was undertaken by MTV India, in association with TNS and Quantum Consumer Solutions.


Image: MTV study, Age of Sinnocence.

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