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'Rajasthan voted against CM's rule of terror'

December 08, 2008 13:14 IST

The Mumbai terror attacks [Images] did not appear to have had an impact on Rajasthan voters who voted for Congress despite the Bharatiya Janata Party making it a big issue.

Coverage: Six-State Assembly Polls

AICC General Secretary and Congress's chief campaigner in Rajasthan Ashok Ghelot said that the voters had cast their votes against 'Chief Minster Raje's rule of terror' and not the Mumbai attacks.

"The common people of Rajasthan were terrorised under Raje's rule. Now their mandate is to put her shadow of terror behind," he said.

Ghelot is leading from Sardarpura seat in Jodhpur [Images].

Rajasthan results depressing, says BJP

Asked what he feels made the difference, Ghelot, who spearheaded the party campaign in the state, said the people in Rajasthan found 'a difference between the words and deeds of Vasundhara Raje'.

"There was a difference between what the BJP said and what it did in the state. In almost 27 incidents of police firing 91 farmers were killed, the Meenas and the Gujjars felt agitated and cheated," he claimed.

"The corruption of the Raje administration that had been brought to fore by her own ministers, police brutality and fake promises of MoUs claiming to industrialise the state were how she terrorised people in the state," he alleged.

The Congress is yet to decide on its chief ministerial candidate.

Raje had led the campaign against the Congress on national issues like price rise, terror attacks and Congress's plot to win minority votes by falsely framing Hindu saints.




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