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Celebrating the life of Britain's Queen Victoria

July 22, 2019 08:56 IST

Buckingham Palace, one of the world’s most iconic buildings and a focal point for British national life, is celebrating the 200th anniversary of Queen Victoria's birth with a special exhibition dedicated to Queen Elizabeth’s great-great-grandmother.

Ahead of its public opening, the Queen was given a special preview.

Take a look inside the Queen Victoria Palace Exhibition as it opens at Buckingham Palace in London, England.

An employee poses as she views Queen Victoria's throne. The display aims to tell the story of how the 19th-century sovereign turned the palace into her family home and a centre for national life. The gilded throne was commissioned in 1837. Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters
 

Also on display are clothes belonging to Queen Victoria. For instance (from left to right) Queen Victoria's Stuart Ball costume, 1851 with lace detailing around the shoulders, to Queen Victoria's military jacket, dating from 1855 and the supertunica worn by Queen Victoria during her coronation ceremony. Photograph: Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II looks at a Victorian illusion technique known as Peppers Ghost of a waltz danced at the Crimean Ball of 1856, in the Ballroom at Buckingham Palace. This was the dance that took place to mark the end of the Crimean War. Photograph: Victoria Jones/WPA Pool/Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II looks at a recreation of the 'Victoria' pattern dessert service in the State Dining Room. Photograph: Victoria Jones/WPA Pool/Getty Images

The exhibit also recreates how a Victorian dinner might have looked, with towers of fresh fruit and multi-layered cakes. Photograph: Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images

A lavish recreation of a 19th century dinner in the State Dining room features the highly ornate Alhambra fountain. Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters

An employee poses with one of Queen Victoria's children's dresses. Museum co-curator Dr Amanda Foreman said, "What these objects show is what her words couldn’t express which is this deep, fierce passionate love for her children, and for the recognition that childhood is so important - the thing that she felt she never had." Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters

A casket containing teeth of Queen Victoria's children is also go on display. Wrapped in delicate paper inscribed with italic recordings of names and dates, the teeth are nestled in satin-lined compartments with blue velvet lids featuring tiny golden crowns. The box also has the embroidered names of the monarch’s four oldest children, the Princess Royal, the Prince of Wales, Princess Alice and Prince Alfred. Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters

Sketches by Queen Victoria and writing is seen in one of her journals on display. Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters

Queen Elizabeth II looks at paintings from the Crimean War period, including (top left) Queen Victoria distributing medals on Horse Guards Parade, alongside, alongside Lucy Peter, assistant curator. Photograph: Victoria Jones/WPA Pool/Getty Images

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