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Kashmir after 61 days of clampdown

Last updated on: October 04, 2019 13:11 IST

On August 5, the Narendra Modi-led government abrogated Article 370, which gave the state of Kashmir special powers, and decided to transform the state into two Union Territories -- Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh.

Since then phone networks have been cut off and curfew-like restrictions have been imposed, leaving residents in a state of despair.

On September 29, Union Home Minister Amit Shah attacked the Opposition for spreading “misinformation” about Kashmir. There were no “restrictions”, he said -- they were “only in your mind”.

Sixty one days later, this is what normalcy looks like in the former state, particularly the Kashmir Valley.

A paramilitary trooper stands guard in front the shuttered shops in the city center in Srinagar, the summer capital Kashmir. Indian authorities have deployed its thousands of government forces in Kashmir after India revoked articles 370 and 35A. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images
 

Stray dogs rest on the porch of closed shops with graffiti written on it by Kashmiris in Srinagar. The residents continue to face a communications blackout, as mobile internet services remain suspended. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

Anti-India graffiti can be seen around Srinagar as residents continue to grapple with the fact that they have been cut off from the rest of the country. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

A security force personnel patrols outside his bunker in Srinagar. The government has maintained that the restrictions and communications blackout were needed to keep the peace, reiterating that not a single bullet has been fired after August 5. However, a report recently stated that a local had died due to pellet gun injuries. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

A cow and stray dogs rest on a road in the closed commercial hub of the old city after the revocation of special status in Srinagar. Most of the Valley’s political leadership, including three former chief ministers: the National Conference’s Farooq and Omar Abdullah as well as the People’s Democratic Party’s Mehbooba Mufti, have been locked up. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

A Kashmir family travel in a horse drawn wagon in the old city, as the public transport remains off the roads after the revocation of special status. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

Kashmirs plead forces to allow them to cross the barrier during curfew like restrictions. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

A man drags his luggage in front the shuttered shops in the closed commercial hub during curfew like restrictions, in Srinagar. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

Shops across the Valley shut after the early hours of the morning. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images

Vacant tourist Shikara boats are moored in middle of Dal lake during curfew like restrictions. Tourism has been hit as hotels emptied under the lockdown, so has the handicrafts industry. Photograph: Yawar Nazir/ Getty Images
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