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Liked the second episode of Satyamev Jayate 3? TELL US!

October 13, 2014 15:24 IST

Aamir Khan in Satyamev Jayte 3To lose a loved one in a matter of seconds or hear stories of them bleeding to death on a busy road are things few people would want to ignore -- especially if your Sunday ritual now involves watching Satyamev Jayate, writes Nishi Tiwari.

"Road accidents or murder?" asked the impassioned second episode of Satyamev Jayate 3.

The show opened with the Shailesh Shetye of Mumbai, who recounted the dreadful accident he was in a few years ago that claimed the lives of his pregnant wife, his mother-in-law and the driver of their hired car.

Several other survivors and people, who have lost their loved ones to freak road accidents, follow.

While Aamir is fights back tears with much success, he proceeds to talk to road safety experts, truck drivers, transporters, and government officials to ascertain the reasons behind road accidents and how they can be avoided.

Citing a study that states that as many as 380 people die in road accidents in India on a daily basis, the show thereon launches into its investigation of this less talked about issue with a rare salvo.

While Aamir is suitably less animated and more involved than ever, he throws questions -- both at his audience and the guest transport official -- that is admirably confrontational in tone.

Road CCTV footage of maniacal crashes on intersections, of fatally hurt people waiting for help to arrive on busy streets even as passersby go about their business as if nothing is amiss, outrageous discrepancies on various levels in the Indian transport system evoke a sense of urgency like few things do.

Because unlike other problems we, as a nation, are plagued with, many of us will agree that a road accident is a tragedy most of us actually believe can befall us.

To lose a loved one in a matter of seconds or hear stories of them bleeding to death on a busy road are things few people would want to ignore -- especially if your Sunday ritual now involves watching Satyamev Jayate, with its run-time of over an hour and a half.

What also needs to be mentioned here, is the extended segment of the show -- titled Mumkin Hai -- that started right when Satyamev Jayate concludes.

Hosted by veteran journalist Dibang, the show is telecast live and a more haggard-looking Aamir Khan takes questions from viewers on calls, through the show's Twitter hashtag Mumkin Hai, and other social media platforms, about the day’s discourse. 

Aamir offered his own inputs, observations and conclusions in front of a live audience.

It’s a good idea to continue the dialogue and engage with viewers in a more interactive setting, but given the fact that most aspects of the subject have been dealt with on the episode, it'd make morw sense to have this new segment carried out on an online platform.

Over two hours of runtime for a weekly show is a bit much, I reckon.

Liked the second episode of Satyamev Jayate 3? TELL US!

Nishi Tiwari/Rediff.com in Mumbai