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Rediff.com  » Sports » Alankamony clinches her second WISPA title

Alankamony clinches her second WISPA title

October 21, 2012 18:04 IST

Asian junior gold medallist Anaka Alankamony claimed her second title and first one abroad in the women's professional squash tour when she stunned top seed Kylie Lindsay of New Zealand in the final of the Ipswich Open in Queensland on Sunday.

The 18-year-old trainee at the Indian Squash Academy, Chennai, took advantage of a string of errors from the World No. 39 to win in straight games 11-8, 13-11, 11-5 in hot and humid conditions.

Alankamony, World ranked 93, had earlier beaten sixth seed Cheyna Tucker of South Africa in the semifinals and fourth seeded Christine Nunn of Australia in the quarters to complete a weekend of upsets.

The Chennai girl settled far quicker than Lindsay in the summit clash and took control in all three games to record a comfortable win.

"It's been an amazing week for me. I was seventh seed for this tournament so it feels really good to win here," Alankamony said.

"I had a five-setter in the morning today and yesterday I had a five setter and a four setter, so it was a long day yesterday and today, but it feels wonderful now," she added.

Alankamony, who was recently awarded the Young Achiever Award by Rotary Club of Madras Northwest, said she felt at home in these conditions.

"I train in Chennai and it's very humid there and I think it was a big advantage for me because it's a similar climate over there. The climate didn't really affect me -- I really enjoyed playing here," she said.

Alankamony had become the youngest ever to win a WISPA title at the age of 15 and the second Indian to do so after Joshna Chinappa. She had defeated compatriot Surbhi Misra 3-0 in the Indian Challenger-I squash tournament final in September 2009.

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