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The men who are saving Japan from nuclear mayhem

Last updated on: March 25, 2011 08:52 IST

The men who are saving Japan from nuclear mayhem

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A group of engineers, scientists and volunteers are working inside the quake-hit Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan to contain the threat of a atomic crisis.

These men are facing high levels of radiation while carrying out their jobs, but are bravely continuing in order to save their country from a nuclear disaster.

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Image: Tokyo Electric Power Co. workers record the status of instruments in a control room at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant
Photographs: Reuters
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The men who are saving Japan from nuclear mayhem

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The massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11 had damaged the nuclear plant extensively, leading to wide-spread fears about uncontrollable radiation leak.

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Image: Tokyo Electric Power Co. workers record the status of instruments in a control room at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant
Photographs: Reuters
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The men who are saving Japan from nuclear mayhem

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The radiation has reportedly affected tap water in faraway Tokyo.

Some countries like Russia, Australia and Canada have already imposed restrictions on the import of food items from Japan.

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Image: Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency shows Tokyo Electric Power Co. workers checking the parameters of instruments in the central control room at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant
Photographs: Reuters
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The men who are saving Japan from nuclear mayhem

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Premier Naoto Kan, meanwhile, warned consumers against eating leafy vegetables such as spinach harvested in Fukushima, as radioactive material far exceeding legal limits were found in vegetables in the region.

Japanese authorities have stepped up their efforts to increase the supply of bottled water in light of the drawn-out crisis at the quake-hit nuclear power plant, as stores in Tokyo were running out of the commodity.

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Image: Firefighters wearing respirators work at the Fukushima nuclear plant
Photographs: Reuters
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The men who are saving Japan from nuclear mayhem

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Three workers were affected by radiation at the crippled Fukushima plant on Thursday, said authorities. They were laying cable at the No.3 reactor's turbine building when they were exposed to high radiation.

Two of them were hospitalised due to injuries to their legs.

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Image: Firefighters wearing respirators work at the Fukushima nuclear plant
Photographs: Reuters
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The men who are saving Japan from nuclear mayhem

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They were exposed to 170-180 millisievert of radiation, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said, adding that two of the workers had their feet under water while laying the cable, Kyodo reported.

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Image: Firefighters wearing respirators work at the Fukushima nuclear plant
Photographs: Reuters
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The men who are saving Japan from nuclear mayhem

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The radiation exposure level was lower than the maximum limit of 250 millisievert set by the health ministry for workers tackling the crisis at the Fukushima plant.

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Image: Firefighters wearing respirators work at the Fukushima nuclear plant
Photographs: Reuters
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The men who are saving Japan from nuclear mayhem

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As many as 9,408 people have been confirmed dead and nearly 15,000 are missing after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

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Image: Workers spray water on the No. 4 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant
Photographs: Reuters
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Authorities have estimated that the economic cost from the March 11 quake on seven affected prefectures would be up to 25 trillion yen ($309 billion) and warned that Japanese exports and industrial output could halt recoveries due to the disaster.

 

 


Image: The central control room for the No. 3 reactor at the Tokyo Electric Power Co. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Tomioka, Fukushima Prefecture is pictured in a handout photo
Photographs: Reuters
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