rediff.com

NewsApp (Free)

Read news as it happens
Download NewsApp

Available on  

Rediff News  All News 
Rediff.com  » News » Connecting the terror dots: RSS, revenge, Swami and Samjhauta

Connecting the terror dots: RSS, revenge, Swami and Samjhauta

February 06, 2014 13:42 IST

Connecting the terror dots

     Next

Next
Vicky Nanjappa

In shocking revelations, Swami Aseemanand claims though RSS chief Mohan Bhagwat was not directly involved with the terror strikes, he was aware that such attacks were being planned. Rediff.com's Vicky Nanjappa finds out more.

Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh Sarsanghchalak Mohan Bhagwat not only knew about the plan to carry out terror attacks on the Samjhauta Express and at the Mecca Masjid in Hyderabad, he even pledged his moral support for the dastardly strikes.

That is the latest, and shocking, claim made by terror accused Swami Aseemanand.

The former RSS activist, who is facing multiple charges for allegedly playing a major role in orchestrating these terror strikes, is currently in prison.

In shocking revelations, Aseemanand has claimed in an interview with Caravan magazine, that though Bhagwat was not directly involved with the terror strikes, he was aware that such attacks were being planned and he had assured the swami of his moral support.

'We will not be involved. But if you are doing this, you can consider that we are with you. This will be on the right course,' Aseemanand quotes Bhagwat as saying in the magazine article.

Officials of the National Investigation Agency, which has probed the terror cases and filed a chargesheet against Aseemanand, are sceptical though about the swami's claims. He has a tendency of making grandiose statements and then backtracking, making the NIA go on a wild goose chase, agency operatives point out.

Kindly click NEXT for more...


Image: Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh Sarsanghchalak Mohan Bhagwat.


     Next

Connecting the terror dots

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Vicky Nanjappa

This time, NIA agents have decided not to jump to any hasty conclusions over the swami's claims.

"Not once during questioning did he name Mohan Bhagwat. There is no reason for us to act suo motu on the case. We will wait for a court order and act only after that," an NIA official told Rediff.com

If Aseemanand wanted to walk the talk, the NIA agent pointed out, he would record his statement, incriminating Bhagwat, before a magistrate.

Then the allegation would be recorded in a court of law and it would become part of the case.

"Bhagwat's name never cropped up during our investigation," the NIA agent added. "If Aseemanand is serious about his claims, he will record his statement before the court."

The swami's latest allegation makes the situation problematic for the NIA as the trial related to these terror strikes have commenced.

Aseemanand's timing is suspect as he is set to be tried in a court in Panipat, Haryana, on February 24, in the case of RSS activist Sunil Joshi's murder.

According to the case put together by the NIA, Sunil Joshi, a RSS pracharak who was allegedly involved in the planning of multiple terror strikes, was killed by his accomplices in December 2007.

Joshi was killed when he decided to abandon terror activities and threatened to spill the beans to the authorities about future strikes being planned by his associates.

Kindly click NEXT for more...


Image: Swami Aseemanand, the terror accused.


Prev     Next

Connecting the terror dots

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Vicky Nanjappa

An indignant RSS has angrily dismissed the charges against its chief Mohan Bhagwat, saying Aseemanand is trying to sully the organisation's reputation with his allegations.

Some NIA officials are not so quick to refute the swami's claims; they believe he feels let down by fellow terror masterminds.

Other conspirators in the terror strikes may have gotten away scot-free, these NIA officials point out, adding that Aseemanand may feel he has been targeted selectively.

"Why does he refuse to say the same thing before the court?" is something that puzzles NIA sleuths involved with the case.

The NIA believes it has a solid case against the swami. The agency has filed a chargesheet detailing his forays in the murderous world of terror.

Aseemanand was angry about the attacks on Hindu shrines, the NIA chargesheet says, and he allegedly discussed the matter with accomplices including Sunil Joshi, Pragya Singh and Bharatbhai.

This group of conspirators allegedly decided to go with 'Bomb ka badla bomb' (avenge a terror strike with another).

Kindly click NEXT for more...


Image: The Samjhauta Express, after the blast.


Prev     Next

Connecting the terror dots

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Vicky Nanjappa

In October 2005, RSS leader Indresh Kumar allegedly held a meeting with Sunil Joshi and Swami Aseemanand near Shabri Dham in Gujarat to discuss the terror strikes, the NIA chargesheet alleges.

A year later, a meeting at Mecca Masjid accused Bharatbhai's home in Valsad, Gujarat, was attended by Aseemanand, Sadhvi Pragya, Joshi, Sandeep Dange, Ramchander Kalsangra, Lokesh Sharma and a man named Amit.

The decision to attack the Samjhauta Express, a train carrying Pakistani passengers, was taken at this meeting.

In 2006, a training camp at Bagli forest in Dewas, Madhya Pradesh, was attended by terror accused Kamal Chauhan, Kalsangra, Sharma, Amit and Chaudhary, the NIA chargesheet alleges.

These men conducted a reconnaissance of the Jamma Masjid and the railway station in Delhi.

While they could not carry out a strike at the heavily guarded Jamma Masjid, they planted a bomb on the Samjhauta Express thanks to the poor security arrangements at the Delhi railway station, the NIA chargesheet alleges.

It provides details about a meeting in 2005 in Jaipur, attended by terror operatives Sharma, Joshi, Kalsangre, Shivam Dhakad, Pragya Singh and RSS leader Indresh Kumar.

At the meeting, the NIA chargesheet alleges Indresh Kumar gave Rs 50,000 to Joshi to carry out the Samjhauta Express attack.

Kindly click NEXT for more...


Image: The Mecca Masjid in Hyderabad, another terror target.


Prev     Next

TOP photo features you missed last week

Prev     More

Click on MORE to see another PHOTO feature...



Tags: 1

Prev     More