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Was a sticker bomb used in the Delhi car blast?

February 13, 2012 20:28 IST

The police say that the sticker bomb technique has not been used by any of the India-based modules, and hence there may be a foreign agency involved, reports Vicky Nanjappa.

Details into the car blast that occurred in New Delhi near the prime minister's residence remain sketchy with investigators still looking for more clues. Four diplomats were injured in the incident.

Investigators confirmed that it was an act of terror, and added that the role of various modules was being looked into. Israel has hinted that the Lebanon-based and Iran-backed Hezbollah could be behind the attack. However, Indian agencies have said that there still is no concrete link to suggest that. They also do not rule out a stray Hezbollah operation in India. There has been a lot of activity ever since the 26/11 attacks in Mumbai where Israelis were openly targeted.

Israel in turn had also stepped up counter-terror operations in the wake of a threat to their citizens. They believe that there are a good number of people -- right from Kerala to the northern part of India -- who were involved in operations against the Israeli population.

Sources have also said that there are many Palestine sympathisers around Delhi and also in the rest of the country, and there is a good chance that one of them could have undertaken this operation.

The police at the moment are looking at local modules in Delhi, who are quite capable of carrying out an attack of this nature. It is not very clear whether the bomb was hurled at the car or planted earlier. There is also a version that suggests that two persons on a motorcycle following the vehicle and also seen sticking something on it at a traffic signal.

The police say that it could be a sticker bomb that can be attached at the last moment to trigger off an explosion. However, what is strange is this technique has not been used by any of the Indian based module and hence there is a doubt of a foreign agency being involved, the police point out.

Vicky Nanjappa