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Pak should 'seriously' consider Indian evidence: Sharif

January 13, 2009 19:18 IST

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Former premier Nawaz Sharif [Images] on Tuesday said Pakistan should "seriously" consider the evidence handed over by India on the Mumbai [Images] attacks and highlighted the need to keep the direct communication channel between the two countries open to avoid "misunderstandings".

"We should seriously take notice of the evidence that has been received and pay attention to it. At the least, we should not give anyone an opportunity to say that Pakistan is dragging its feet in investigating the matter," Sharif, chief of the opposition Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz party, said.

Calling for a joint investigation into the Mumbai attacks by Pakistan and India, he told a news conference that the two countries should try to avoid "point-scoring".

"We should fulfill our responsibilities and convince India to work with us to conduct an inquiry. There should not be any point-scoring because that will be damaging and disastrous for both countries," he said.

Asked about information on the Mumbai incident being shared by India with Pakistan through the US, Sharif said: "I think India should open a channel for direct communication with Pakistan. If this channel has been closed for some reason, both countries should make efforts to open it again."

Sharif also called on the world community to address the root causes of terrorism, noting that the Israeli aggression in Palestine is encouraging "non-state elements to act".



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