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Will renegotiate N-deal when we come to power, says BJP

October 02, 2008 19:30 IST

Describing the Indo-US nuclear deal as a "blind trap" and tantamount to acceding to the NPT regime, BJP today said once it comes to power it would renegotiate the deal and even keep open the right to conduct a nuclear test if need arises.

"This deal has many shortcomings. When the BJP comes to power it will re-think and renegotiate the deal. If need be we will keep open the right to conduct nuclear tests," BJP spokesperson Rajiv Pratap Rudy said.

Rudy accused Prime Minister Manmohan Singh [Images] of "denying" the basic facts of the deal including the provision stating that the deal would be annulled if India conducted nuclear tests.

"The unambiguous and conclusive remarks by the US Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice that any nuclear test by India will have serious consequences including the automatic termination of all co-operation....vindicates the BJP stand that India has abrogated all its rights to conduct nuclear tests forever," he said.

The saffron party leader said the government may "tom-tom its psuedo-achievement" but the deal has been done at the cost of India's sovereignty and was a "colossal loss" for the country.

"The Indian government has gone for a blind trap knowingly and can't get out of it. We have acceded to the nuclear non-proliferation regime by the Indo-US nuclear deal," Rudy said.

The BJP leader said the "publicised virtues" of the deal are non-existent. "The US has given no binding fuel-supply assurance to India contrary to what the PM had told the Parliament," he said. 




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