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Home > India > News > Report

J&K CM Azad: 'Infiltration, a concern'

Mukhtar Ahmad In Srinagar | May 12, 2008 20:13 IST

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As Jammu observed a near total protest strike on Monday to condemn Sunday's attack on civilians, another terrorist was gunned down by the security forces while trying to sneak into an army camp in the border town of Samba.

Monday's strike was called by almost all the political parties including the National Conference, Congress and the Bharatiya Janata Party to condemn the Samba incident and express sympathy with the bereaved families.

Shops remained shut, traffic was thin and all government offices and educational institutions had low attendance.

Police said another terrorist was gunned down by the army, while he was trying to sneak into the Samba brigade headquarters on Monday morning.

"The sentry at the main entrance demonstrated high alertness by spotting and challenging the terrorist, who responded by firing at the security forces," said Farooq Ahmad Khan, deputy inspector general of police Jammu range.

"The troops retaliated and killed him on the spot," he said.

Meanwhile Jammu and Kashmir [Images] Chief Minister Ghulam [Images] Nabi Azad said that the "infiltration of terrorists from across the border, especially during the past two months, was the only concern" and hoped that the "new government in Pakistan would cooperate with India in checking this and taking forward the process of dialogue and peace" which, he said, had slowed down due to the internal situation in Pakistan.

"The past two years in been the best in terms of the lowest number of killings and incidents of violence," Azad told the British High Commissioner Sir Richard Stagg who called on him.

The chief minister said human rights violations had been brought down to negligible number while no custodial disappearances were reported during the last year and the current year till date.







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