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JK: Governor invites politicians for talks

Mukhtar Ahmad in Srinagar | July 08, 2008 13:06 IST

Jammu and Kashmir [Images] seems to be set for a stint of Governor's rule, the fourth since 1947, following the fall of Ghulam [Images] Nabi Azad-led 31-month-old coalition government.

Adhering to the principle of constitutional consultative process, the Governor on Tuesday invited leaders of various political parties for confabulations. 

"The Governor invited the leaders of various political parties in pursuance of the Constitutional consultative process. Based on the consultations held by him with the leaders of the various political parties, the Governor is in the process of firming up his assessment of the Constitutional situation for initiating the future course of action," a Raj Bhavan spokesman said.

The first to meet the Governor at Raj Bhavan was the president of the National Conference (NC), Omar Abdullah.

He was accompanied by Abdul Rahim Rather, leader of the Opposition in the state assembly.

Omar told the Governor about his party's position consequent to the chief minister's resignation, according to the spokesman.

People's Democratic Party (PDP) president Mehbooba Mufti along with Muzaffar Hussain Beig and Abdul Aziz Zargar also met the governor yesterday and conveyed to him PDP's position in regard to the obtaining political situation.

Vohra later met a 5-member delegation of Jammu and Kashmir National Panther's Party (JKNPP) led by its president, Professor Bhim Singh.

He was accompanied by four members of the legislative assembly belonging to his Party. The governor had discussion with Mohammed Yusuf Tarigami, state secretary, CPI(M).

By all indications, the state is headed for a spell of Governor's rule as no single party or a combination of various parties would be able to form a new government.






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