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SP dilly-dallies on joining UPA government

August 05, 2008 16:28 IST

The Samajwadi Party on Tuesday gave mixed signals on the possibility of joining the UPA Government, maintaining that it was the second largest party on the ruling side but becoming part of the coalition is not important.

"Our party has emerged as the second largest party on the support of which the government is running. Samajwadi Party is recognised as a major force. This is very important. The question of joining the government is not important," party general secretary Amar Singh [Images] said.

Replying to questions from reporters on the issue, Singh as also party chief Mulayam Singh Yadav [Images] said that there was no move as of now.

Singh also narrated how Afghan President Hamid Karzai [Images] held Yadav in high esteem at the Presidential banquet last night in honour of the visiting dignitary to drive home the importance of the Samajwadi Party.

Singh quoted Karzai as having said that he knew Yadav well and the Samajwadi Party which supported the government. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh [Images] had also remarked that this is the party "which saved us and helped us to go for nuclear energy", he said.

Speaking on the sidelines of 76th birthday celebrations of senior party leader Janeshwar Mishra, Singh as also Yadav said the SP had supported the government in the interest of the country.

Party leader Shivpal Singh Yadav, however, sought to throw the ball in Congress court, saying that inducting anyone in the government was the prerogative of the Prime Minister and the question should be asked to him (Prime Minister). 

 




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