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Home > News > Report

Power's a great adhesive. Will it work in K'taka?

Vicky Nanjappa in Bangalore | November 17, 2007 12:34 IST

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The political scenario in Karnataka over the past couple of months can be summed up as messy. First it was the spat between coalition partners Janata Dal Secular and Bharatiya Janata Party, and then their kiss and make up drama that ultimately led to the formation of the government, which made headlines.

It is not as though formation of the government has brought about peace between the two parties. While H D Deve Gowda puts on his thinking cap every night to jot down one new condition to impose for the BJP, his son Kumaraswamy spares no effort in telling what the BJP to do.

The BJP seems to be quiet at the moment, as there is a very important floor test for them to pass. Unless the BJP has the blessings of the JDS there is no way they can pass the floor test. This brings to us to the key question and that is how the government will function if both parties are at war every day.

Watching the developments closely one gets the impression that the war of words which is on between the two parties at the moment is more for public consumption. In Karnataka, it is very important for any party to show that they are in command. The Karnataka voters' mindset is such that it will not vote for any party, which is meek and succumbs easily to pressure.

Sources in JDS and BJP say that apart from running the government, it is important for them to show that they are in control of the government. When Dharam Singh, the Congress leader was in power with the blessings of the JDS, it was very evident that the latter called the shots.

Even when Kumaraswamy formed the government with the BJP, the entire show was being run by the JDS and the BJP always looked as though it was playing second fiddle. This show of strength by the JDS on both occasions only helped the party and it got the required results in the local body polls where it emerged as a winner.

The BJP too has realised that it cannot win the hearts of the people though administration alone. There is a need to be assertive in nature. The recent statement by Chief Minister B S Yeddyurappa that they are under no pressure to sign a memorandum of understanding with the JDS is proof enough to show that the party does not want to buckle under pressure.

The JDS, meanwhile, will try hard to remain in control of the situation. The party almost lost its vote bank twice in the past. The first time when Yeddyurappa presented a dream budget under the Kumaraswamy government and the second time when the JDS refused to hand over power to the BJP.

The sympathy wave that had been created in favour of the BJP was wiped out by the JDS when it gave support once again. The JDS is also aware that BJP is a national party and there is whole euphoria regarding the first BJP government in the South. Moreover, Yeddyurappa is a good administrator too. All these factors weigh heavily on the minds of the JDS leaders and hence it is important for them to show that they are in control.

So if anyone thinks that there is some major dispute between the two parties, then think again. Both the parties do not want to lose power at any cost at the moment as they are aware that the Congress is waiting to grab any opportunity that comes their way. This government looks like it will last amidst power play and verbal spats every 15 days.







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