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Home > News > PTI

Rains, snow in north India

April 30, 2004 11:20 IST
Last Updated: April 30, 2004 19:34 IST


One person was killed and three injured as torrential rains accompanied by hailstorm lashed much of northwest India bringing much needed relief from the scorching heat even as unexpected heavy snowfall threw life out of gear in several parts of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttaranchal.

Caused by western disturbances and induced upper air cyclonic circulation over Himachal Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir and low pressure over western Rajasthan, rains lashed northwest India, parts of the Peninsula, Orissa, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand and the Northeast while heavy snowfall forced closure of the Srinagar-Jammu National Highway, the only surface link connecting the Kashmir valley with the rest of the country.

There has been a sudden dip in temperatures in several parts of northwest India. Day temperature today in Delhi was 23 degrees Celsius against a normal of about 38 degrees Celsius, Met officials said.

Delhi has recorded over 67mm of rain in April, much above the normal figure of about 11mm, Dr R D Singh of the Indian Meteorological Department said. Delhi received the maximum rainfall for April in 1983 when it got about 183.5mm of rain.

Rains accompanied by black dust storm lashed Jaipur and adjoining towns affecting normal life and vehicular traffic. Several trees were uprooted and the power supply cut off.

Above normal rains have also been recorded in parts of Haryana, Jammu and Kashmir, Uttaranchal, Himachal Pradesh and Punja in April, he said.

So far this month, Delhi has seen major rains four times while there have been light showers two more times.

Attributing rains to western disturbance over Jammu and Kashmir and low pressure over western Rajasthan and its neighbourhood, officials said more rains are expected in the next 24 hours in northwestern India. Hilly areas may experience rains for up to the next two days.

Life was thrown out of gear in Srinagar and several other places in the Kashmir valley following unexpected snowfall even as torrential rains continued to lash Jammu and Kashmir for the third consecutive day. A cold wave swept the valley as day and night temperatures fell by eight and four degrees, respectively.

South Kashmir towns of Anantnag, Pahalgam and Shopian received unseasonal snowfall measuring between one and three inches. The tourist resort of Sonmarg on the Srinagar-Leh National Highway also experienced snowfall reducing the chances of early opening of the road connecting Ladakh to the rest of the state.

In Himachal Pradesh, the tribal Lahaul valley and Dodra-Kwar area of Shimla district were cut off following heavy snowfall in the higher ranges even as mid-hills were lashed by hail and rain as stormy conditions prevailed in the region for the third day.

The Rohtang Pass at a height of 13,500ft recorded 75cm of snow while Mari had 60cm. About a dozen vehicles, including tourist buses, were stranded on either side of the Rohtang Pass.

Normal life in Lahaul valley was paralysed due to heavy snow and efforts were on clear roads. Snow had also blocked the Kunzam Pass, severing the links of Lahaul with the Spiti valley.

Farmers in the valley were worried as continuous moisture and low temperature might rot the sown seeds.

Heavy snowfall lashed the higher reaches of Garhwal and Kumaon Himalayas in Uttaranchal leading to a sharp decline in temperatures and throwing life out gear.

More reports from Delhi
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