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December 20, 2001
1821 IST

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Pak says it will consider any credible evidence

K J M Varma in Islamabad

Pakistan on Thursday said Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee's rejection of a joint probe into last week's terror attack on Parliament created doubts about India's 'motives' and maintained that Islamabad was willing to examine any 'credible evidence' on the involvement of terrorist outfits operating from that country.

Foreign Office spokesman Aziz Ahmed Khan told reporters in Islamabad that Pakistan regretted that India has rejected an 'eminently fair' proposal for a joint inquiry into the incident and believed that an impartial and comprehensive inquiry was necessary for it to take action.

Stating that Pakistan did not want a rise in tensions between the two countries, he said United States Secretary of State Colin Powell had spoken over telephone to Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf as part of diplomatic efforts to cool down tempers.

PTI

Complete Coverage: The Attack on Parliament

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