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'Jabardasth is a comedy carnival'

Last updated on: February 19, 2013 10:39 IST

'Jabardasth is a comedy carnival'

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Radhika Rajamani in Hyderabad

Director B V Nandini Reddy arrived in style with Ala Modalaindi in January 2011. All the struggles she went through were wiped out by the super success of that romantic comedy. Ala Modalaindi was a super-duper hit and critically acclaimed too.

After two years, Nandini is ready with Jabardasth (starring Siddharth and Samantha), another fun film.  

Nandini discusses Jabardasth which releases on February 21.

What was on your mind when you wrote Jabardasth?

Somebody asked me, why don't you make a film on the climax of Ala Modalaindi?  That was playing on my mind.

I wanted to do something different. Jabardasth has a different meter and a different grammar. In Ala Modalaindi the entertainment went up during the climax, while the rest of the film was subtle.

Jabardasth has a different entertainment quotient.

Was the success of Ala Modalaindi weighing on your mind while scripting Jabardasth?

Whether I wanted it or not, it was playing on my mind for a while. I tend not to carry too much baggage. Initially, it was there, but later I had fun writing the story and screenplay of Jabardasth.


Image: A scene from Jabardasth


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'My films are more screenplay-based'

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You seem to be at ease with comedy.

People say I have a sense of humour. It may be natural. It depends on the mind space I am in and what story I want to tell.

What is Jabardasth all about?

It's a madcap film. It's a whole bunch of madcap characters put together in a bhelpuri mix. It's going to be a roller-coaster ride.

My films are more screenplay-based. I end up thinking of characters, and their journey becomes the story.

It's a comedy carnival. If one asks about mass and class film, I would say I have made the mass look cute.

The film is set in Hyderabad.

How did you cast Samantha and Siddharth? You also have Nithya Menen in a cameo...

After watching Samantha in Ye Maaya Chesaave (YMC), I saw she was a good performer. So is Siddharth. I wanted to work with both of them. He was the first choice and it was an interesting pair.

Nithya was already there as I wrote the cameo with her in mind.

I had narrated a different script to Samantha and she came on board. So was the case with Siddharth.

In the interim period, I wrote another which I then narrated to them both and Samantha asked, 'why don't you do this as people don't think you can make a film like this?'

So that became Jabardasth. I do a lot of tweaking while shooting.


Image: A scene from Jabardasth


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'Siddharth plays a character who doesn't speak English'

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What was the contribution of Siddharth and Samantha to the film?

Both are extremely competent and professional actors. They shared my sense of humour. We had fun shooting it. While shooting, they trusted me blindly and had immense faith in me.

Siddharth plays a character who doesn't speak English.

What does Samantha play then?

Samantha's character has a lot more spunk and attitude unlike the sober and sophisticated Jessie and Nithya she has played in YMC and Yeto Vellipoyindi Manasu.

Does Nithya have a significant cameo?

Yes, it is significant. It's a quirky characterisation she has not done before.


Image: A scene from Jabardasth


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'Ala Modalaindi was a struggle right from the beginning'

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You have a well-known producer, Bellamkonda Suresh, backing this project. How did it feel?

I felt like I'm flying business class. He's a fantastic producer.

How was it making Jabardasth compared to your first film Ala Modalaindi?

Ala Modalaindi was a struggle right from the beginning. Everything I did was a question mark. Everything was a struggle. There were no stars, no finances, no theatres. Even the producer struggled.

Maybe that's why the success of the film was sweeter. I felt vindicated. I feel I can tackle anything now. Mr Damodar Prasad, the producer, said, 'make a film we'll be proud of'. He stood by me because somewhere in his heart he too believed in the film.

With Jabardasth (where there are stars and a big producer) less publicity gets you more eyeballs and conversely, expectations go up. The expectations are sky high and whether we match them or not is a task.

I met some wonderful technicians. There were four cameramen and Thaman composed the music. Working with new people added a lot.

I introduced new actors. I relish these new associations. Every film becomes a DVD some day but these are long lasting relationships and life's lessons learnt.

Is the Tamil version of the film releasing later?

Yes, probably in early summer.


Image: A scene from Jabardasth


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'I don't consider myself in the top league of directors'

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How does it feel to be in the top league of directors?

I don't consider myself that. I made a film and it was a huge success. If it's commercially successful, then it's a huge bonus.

If I can instil faith in the audience that there is a certain quality in my film, I'm happy. It's my way of storytelling and the audience is identifying with it.

Have you thought about your next project?

There are ideas but I'll take it up only after the release of Jabardasth.

Do you feel nervous now?

I feel less nervous. There are good and bad days. There are good and bad jitters. The emptiness after making the film is already setting in.


Image: A scene from Jabardasth


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