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Rediff.com  » Movies » Angadi Theru's music has its moments

Angadi Theru's music has its moments

May 13, 2009 12:34 IST

Ayngaran International's Tamil movie Angadi Theru (Market Street) directed by Veyil fame G Vasanthabalan has music composed by both G V Prakash Kumar and Vijay Antony.

Here's how it sounds:

Composed by Vijay Antony and sung by Ranjith, Vineeth Srinivas and Janaki Iyer, Aval Appadi Onrum Azhagillai begins with a rather familiar melodious flute and sarod piece. It's all about a girl who's really not that beautiful but still captivates her beloved. It's a raga-based, decidedly romantic tune, replete with the cloying sweetness reserved for such songs. This one's still worth a listen, if only, for the first pallavi's mellow feel.

G V Prakash Kumar's composed Kadhaigalai Pesum Vizhi makes you sit up despite the fleeting resemblance to Loosu Penne. The distinctly Latino melody that forms the backdrop of this romantic number takes you by surprise. The lyrics are rather commonplace but Benny Dayal's breathy and youthful voice coupled with Hamsika is just perfect. The catchy rhythm stays with you throughout, as does a cute flute interlude. But the charanam lets you down, as the tune meanders rather aimlessly.

Kannil Theriyum Vaanam, sung and composed by G V Prakash Kumar reminds you more than once of A R Rahman's early works; be it the angsty-hopeful melody, or the nasal voice. It's pretty much run-of-the-mill.

A nice departure from the previous number is Un Perai Sollum Pothe, sung by Naresh Iyer, Shreya Ghoshal and Hari Charan. It is a rather folksy number complete with sedate beats, and flute segments. The violin interlude is neat but the lyrics are a bit trite. This is one of those tunes that, no matter how familiar or repeated, still manage to be melodious with their gentleness.

With its sparse beats and anguish in equal parts comes Enge Povaeno, composed by Vijay Antony. The best thing about this number is Janaki Iyer's brief, solo aalap. Benny Dayal brings up the agony of the jilted lover, perhaps, blending a mild Hindustani flavour with his song. Worth a listen.

Karungali Naaye written and sung by the Nellai Boys certainly begins intriguingly. It is a folksy number set to synthesized music; half song, half conversation that brings youthful victories, dialect, slang and teases to the fore. This one, obviously, has more to it than just the music.

With two composers coming together for one album, the results are a bit mixed. Though most of the tunes are familiar and none take you to scintillating heights, they are pleasant, and worth a listen.

Rediff Rating:

Pavithra Srinivasan