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'A glamorous job, a handsome salary, an eye on the world...'

Ashish Sharma | July 08, 2005

Working as an air-hostess has always been considered a career option for young women in urban India. But, now, Punjab's rural girls have demolished the perception.

Five years ago, it may have been unheard of but, today, courtesy a media and tube blitzkrieg, it seems to be the most natural thing on earth. 

image At the Jalandhar branch of the Frankfinn Institute of Air Hostess Training, there are plenty of such examples.

Neighbouring Dasuya's Anjali says, "I left engineering and opted to train as an air-hostess because I was convinced it would offer me more in every way, including job satisfaction, and I would be able to see the world."

Anjali, like many other girls living in peripheral villages, comes daily to the city to attend classes.

The Frankfinn Institute, yet to complete a year in Jalandhar, has got a huge response from rural youngsters. "It's true this profession is usually considered an option for urban girls, but the reality is that a number of girls and boys from villages are interested in signing up," says Frankfinn's Shalini Praveen.

Praveen says girls and boys with a rural background just need to work a little harder than their urban counterparts to gain a foothold in this job. "They are shy initially because their exposure to the world hasn't been the same, but they open up and learn as quickly," she says.

Despite stiff competition, the number of aspirants is increasing by the day. Praveen attributes it to awareness, primarily through the media. "Some time ago, people looked down upon it -- today, the applications tell another story," she says.

There are great prospects in the industry. "It offers excellent career opportunities," explains Mandeep Grover, who has been recently selected by Jet Airways. 

"My parents encouraged me to opt for it, and the training here has helped me immensely. Earlier, I hesitated talking with anyone but today I am confident and believe my entire personality has undergone a change for the better," she says.

Mandeep's father, Colonel Harbhajan Singh Grover, says, "I was delighted when Mandeep was selected."

Frankfinn has 30 centres around the world, one each in Jalandhar, Ludhiana, and Chandigarh. "A glamorous job, a handsome salary, an eye on the world -- what else could I have asked for," says Sharnjit Bhinder, who is all set to join Yemen Airways.

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Number of User Comments: 5




Sub: airhostess

In begining career sees to be glamorous but lacks challange,variety of assignment,future career progression.


Posted by rajendra kumar





Sub: it is fair

I think it is fair that they shud earn more than engineers for air hostesses are the face of the airline. Hence they take the ...


Posted by Vaibhav





Sub: Flying high

There's nothing wrong in people changing career intrests or goals. The motive may be monetary or other rewards, one definitly has a right to choose ...


Posted by johnny





Sub: flying high

HI, it look like our educational system sucks. reez.


Posted by reez





Sub: Flying High

It is shameful that an Engineer has to work as an Air Hostess to get high salary. Are Engineers cheaper than Air Hostess? Something wrong ...


Posted by Mr P.J.LAKHAPATE




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