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Ashes: How England won the first Test

July 14, 2013 21:03 IST

Ashes: How England won the first Test

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It was a match that swung like a pendulum. There were no clear favourites for the match right from Day 1.

PHOTOS Ashes: England win first Test by 14 runs, take 1-0 lead

Scorecard

If Peter Siddle gave Australia a good start to help restrict England to a low score, the hosts' bowlers brought the team back into reckoning with their fiery spells.

James Anderson and Steven Finn led England's fightback with the ball with two wickets apiece to reduce Australia to 75 for four at stumps on the opening day, with Steven Smith on 38 and Phil Hughes on seven.


Image: Man of the Match James Anderson of England celebrates victory after day five of the 1st Investec Ashes Test match at Trent Bridgeon Sunday
Photographs: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

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Agar steals show

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Australia had nearly lost the plot on Day 2, collapsing to 117 for nine. However, debutant No 11 bat Ashton Agar and Phil Hughes came together and resurrected the Aussie innings.

The 19-year-old Agar shared a record last-wicket partnership of 163 with Hughes to give Australia a lead of 65 before England recovered from the loss of two early wickets to reach 80 for two in their second innings at the close.

Day 3 clearly belonged to England. There was some dogged batting from overnight batsmen Alastair Cook and Kevin Pietersen. Both struck half-centuries. 


Image: Ashton Agar celebrates after reaching his half-century
Photographs: Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

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KP, Bell shine; Broad refuses to 'walk'

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While Pietersen went about his job playing the attacker, Cook gave him good company and was more than happy to play second fiddle.

After their dismissal, it was senior man Ian Bell who took charge. Bell and Johnny Bairstow combined well to steady England after lunch.

The pair had a 43 run-partnership for the fifth wicket. Bell brought up a well-made half century and was later lucky to be dropped by Brad Haddin.

The 31-year-old Bell was unbeaten on 95 and had Stuart Broad for company at close of play.

England eked out a lead of 261 runs in an atmosphere of great tension at Trent Bridge as controversy erupted in the final session when Broad edged young spinner Ashton Agar to Michael Clarke at first slip via the gloves of wicketkeeper Brad Haddin.

Umpire Aleem Dar did not give the all-rounder out and he refused to 'walk' as he left the tourists, who had used up their two referrals, fuming.


Image: Kevin Pietersen plays a shot
Photographs: Gareth Copley/Getty Images

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Bell, Broad propel England; Siddle to Aus rescue

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Bell (109) and Broad reached individual milestones enroute a 138-run seven wicket partnership. Bell’s 18th Test century (He faced 267 balls, hit 15 fours and batted for six and a half hours) put England firmly in control of the match. Australia then wrapped up the Aussie tail with Siddle again pick of the bowlers with figures of three for 85.

Needing 311 runs for a win, Australia’s Shane Watson shared a solid opening partnership of 84 with Chris Rogers. But once Watson perished for 46, off the bowling of Broad, the Aussie line-up crumbled.

Besides, having Watson out, he also had Michael Clarke (23) caught behind.

Michael Clarke, Steve Smith and Phil Hughes fell in quick succession to tilt an extraordinary match back England's way.

Anderson sent back opener Rogers for 52 and by the end of the day Australia reached 174-6 in their second innings.


Image: Ian Bell and Stuart Broad
Photographs: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

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Five-star Anderson buries Australia

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Day five was Anderson’s day. Anderson took three quick wickets but Haddin and last man James Pattinson showed great courage to put their side on the brink of an amazing victory.

Haddin struck a patient fifty while Pattinson gave him support. But it was Anderson who was going home the victor after an inspiring spell.

Anderson forced Haddin, on 71, to nick a catch through to wicketkeeper Matt Prior.

The England fielders celebrated but umpire Aleem Dar did not raise his finger, forcing captain Alastair Cook to call for a review.

The third official reviewed the incident and, after a lengthy delay, told Dar to give Haddin out. 


Image: James Anderson celebrates the wicket of Ashton Agar
Photographs: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

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