rediff.com

NewsApp (Free)

Read news as it happens
Download NewsApp

Available on  

Rediff News  All News 
Rediff.com  » Business » China flags off Beijing-Shanghai bullet train

China flags off Beijing-Shanghai bullet train

Last updated on: June 30, 2011 15:17 IST

China flags off Beijing-Shanghai bullet train

     Next

Next
China on Thursday flagged off its much talked about high-speed bullet trains linking Beijing and Shanghai ahead of friday's 90th anniversary of the ruling Communist Party of China (CPC).

The train cuts the travel time of the 1,318-km route to just 5 hours, half of what it took previously.

Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao travelled by the first train to Shanghai after formally flagging if off in Beijing.

Click NEXT to read on

Image: A train driver sits in a new high-speed train before it departs from the Beijing-South railway station.
Photographs: David Gray/Reuters.
     Next

China flags off Beijing-Shanghai bullet train

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
The train links China's prosperous Pan-Bohai and Yangtze River Delta economic zones, cutting the train-travel time between the two cities to under five hours.

The bullet trains were currently being operated between several Chinese cities. However, Beijing-Shanghai covers the longest distance.

The Beijing-Shanghai train track was laid at the cost 215 billion yuan ($32.5 billion). A one-way ticket on this route will cost $63-270. It is expected to carry 80 million passengers a year.

Click NEXT to read on


Image: A train attendant helps a passenger on a train.
Photographs: Reuters.
Prev     Next

China flags off Beijing-Shanghai bullet train

Prev     Next
Prev

Next

The train travels at a maximum operating speed of about 300 kph (185 mph) instead of originally targeted 350 kph (216 mph) for safety reasons.

The train was also launched amid reports that the costs involved in running high speed trains, which also needed special tracks were driving the railway into heavy debt.

China has the world's longest high-speed rail (HSR) network with about 8,358 kilometres of routes in service as of January 2011 including 2,197 km (1,365 mi) of rail lines with top speeds of 350 km/h (220 mph).

Click NEXT to read on


Image: A new high-speed train arrives at the Beijing-South railway station.
Photographs: David Gray/Reuters.
Prev     Next

China flags off Beijing-Shanghai bullet train

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
Write ups in official media in Beijing quoted the National Audit Office, as saying that the Railway Ministry was burdened with 1.3 trillion yuan ($200 billion) in debt in 2009 due to expenditure being incurred on the high speed tracks.

The Chinese government is going ahead with massive expansion of the high speed trains with new plans to expand the network to 13,000 km of track this year and 16,000 km by 2020.

The trains are also putting pressure on country's domestic airlines forcing to radically slash their ticket fares.

The electric bullet train, CRH-380A has been designed by China South Locomotive & Rolling Stock Corporation Limited (CSR) and manufactured by CSR Qingdao Sifang Locomotive & Rolling Stock Co.

Click NEXT to read on


Image: CRH-380A.

Prev     Next

China flags off Beijing-Shanghai bullet train

Prev     Next
Prev

Next
CRH-380A is one of the four Chinese train series, which have been designed to run at an operating speed of 380 km/hr (236 mph) on newly constructed high-speed railway network.

Click NEXT to read on


Image: China's high speed train.

Prev     Next

China flags off Beijing-Shanghai bullet train

Prev     More
Prev

More
By 2012, China will have more high-speed train tracks than the rest of the world.

China has plans to extend its high speed rail network to northern Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore.

China also has ambitious plans to extend its high-speed rail network to Europe.


Image: China's high speed trains.

Prev     More
© Copyright 2014 PTI. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PTI content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent.